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Editorial & Opinion | Gary Rosenblatt

07/08/2015 | | Editor and Publisher | Gary Rosenblatt

Michael Oren, the highly respected historian and former Israeli ambassador to the U.S., has become the latest lightning rod in the bitter struggle among those who profess to know what’s best for Israel. And like the Jewish state he served as diplomat, and now as Knesset member, Oren has gone from chief unifier to deep divider for many American Jews.

07/02/2015 | | Editor and Publisher | Gary Rosenblatt

Michael Oren, the highly respected historian and former Israeli Ambassador to the U.S., has become the latest lightning rod in the bitter struggle among those who profess to know what’s best for Israel. And like the Jewish state he served as diplomat, and now as Knesset member, Oren has gone from chief unifier to deep divider for many American Jews.

07/01/2015 | | Editor and publisher | Gary Rosenblatt

If the friendship between Hanan Schlesinger, an American-born Orthodox rabbi and self-described “passionate Zionist settler,” and Ali Abu Awwad, a leading Palestinian activist who served a four-year jail sentence in Israel for membership in a terrorist cell, was typical of West Bank Jews and Palestinians, we would be living in Messianic times.

06/24/2015 | | Editor and Publisher | Gary Rosenblatt

Speaking at the Grand Synagogue in Paris after the Charlie Hebdo and kosher supermarket murders in January, Israeli Prime Minister Netanyahu stirred controversy when he announced: “Any Jew who chooses to come to Israel will be greeted with open arms and an open heart; it is not a foreign nation, and hopefully they and you will one day come to Israel.”

06/17/2015 | | Editor and Publisher | Gary Rosenblatt

In January 2011, with the U.S. trying hard to convince the Palestinians to withdraw or moderate a United Nations Security Council resolution condemning Israeli settlements, President Obama called Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas to make a deal.

06/10/2015 | | Editor and Publisher | Gary Rosenblatt

In 1965, President Lyndon Johnson sent the first U.S. combat troops to South Vietnam, Levi Eshkol was elected prime minister of Israel, and Dodgers pitcher Sandy Koufax chose not to pitch in the opening game of the World Series because it fell on Yom Kippur. It was also that year that Abraham Foxman, a 25-year-old immigrant fresh out of law school, took a job as assistant director of the legal department of the Anti-Defamation League of B’nai B’rith.