Yiddish

Adrienne Cooper, Mother Of Yiddish Revival Movement

Singer served as bridge between generations.

12/27/2011
Special to the Jewish Week

When Adrienne Cooper died Sunday night, Dec. 25, she left a gap in the world of Yiddish that no one person could possibly fill. Yet she had filled it for decades.

Adrienne Cooper.

Philip Levine, Poet Laureate; Or "A dirty Detroit Jew with Bad Manners"

It was announced this week that Philip Levine, 83, will be the new U.S. poet laureate.  If it isn't obvious from his name, he's Jewish.  But that's no surprise with regard to poet laureates--Louise Gluck was the last Jewish honoree, in 2003, and Robert Pinksy held the distinction (i.e. laureate and Jewish) three years before that. Plus, there's Joseph Brodsky, Karl Shapiro, and many others I'm skipping.

Meet Joseph Dorman, Director Of "Sholem Aleichem, Laughing In The Darkness"

Joseph Dorman is director of a riveting portrait of the great writer whose stories became the basis of the Broadway musical Fiddler on the Roof. "Sholem Aleichem: Laughing in the Darkness" tells the tale of the rebellious genius who created an entirely new literature. Dorman calls Sholem Aleichem the "grandfather of all Jewish comedians today."

Taboo, But Educational

Jewish version of popular Hasbro game gets clues from Encyclopedia Judaica.

07/21/2011
Staff Writer

When Seth Burstein and Ian Framson started throwing clues at each other while playing the card game “Taboo,” they came up with more than just a way to kill an afternoon.

The two Jewish friends and serial entrepreneurs, amused by the game that requires teams to guess topics without the most obvious hints, began offering a mix of Hebrew and Yiddish phrases to help one another.

Board of Jewish Education: Seth Burstein with his Hebrew-word packed game.

Taboo, But Educational

Jewish version of popular board game gets clues from Encyclopedia Judaica.

07/21/2011
Staff Writer

When Seth Burstein and Ian Framson started throwing clues at each other while playing the board game “Taboo,” they came up with more than just a way to kill an afternoon.

The two Jewish friends and serial entrepreneurs, amused by the game that requires teams to guess topics without the most obvious hints, began offering a mix of Hebrew and Yiddish phrases to help one another.

Where Children Still Roam Safe, And Other Reflections

As I write this, we are packed for another weekend up in the Catskills, a place where it's still considered pretty safe for small kids to roam unattended within the confines of bungalow colonies. This is why The Mountains continie to draw tens of thousands of New York area, mostly Orthodox families, to leave their comfortable homes for broken-down shacks that list to starboard like a sinking ship, have broken appliances, leaky roofs, bad ventillation and are shared with all manner of crawling things.

An Interview With Director Eve Annenberg

 Aaron Herman discusses "Romeo and Juliet" with director Eve Annenberg.

First-Ever Translation of Yiddish Cookbook Yields Old World Treasures, New World Advice

04/08/2011
JTA

TEL AVIV (JTA) -- When a rare volume of a 1914 cookbook written in Yiddish for American Jewish housewives came into the hands of Bracha Weingrod, the once popular but forgotten book began its long journey from dusty oblivion to celebrated translation.

The thick, worn copy of “Dos Familien Kokh-Bookh,” now newly translated by Weingrod as “The Yiddish Family Cookbook,” appears to be the only Yiddish cookbook now on the market.

Folksbiene Connects To Tradition

12/29/2010
Special to the Jewish Week

The National Yiddish Theater/Folksbiene has come a long way in its 96th season. In fact, the highlight of its annual cabaret dinner on Dec. 8 at the Bohemian National Hall on the Upper East Side, were two African American actors who brought the house down with their versions of classical Yiddish medleys.

Elmore James, a veteran of five Broadway shows and the Metropolitan Opera, dazzled with “Es Brent” and “Ot Azoy.” Tony Perry, featured in the film “Mickey,” thrilled the audience with his rendition of “Vos Iz Gevorn.”

Marion and Elie Wiesel were honored by the Folksbiene at a cabaret dinner. Photo by Tim Boxer

New Musical Life For A Supposedly Dead Language

Adrienne Cooper performs new/old Yiddish songs at Drom.

11/04/2010
Special To The Jewish

Jewish history is too unpredictable for folks to count out the Yiddish language just yet. After all, 200 years ago Hebrew was supposedly a dead language used only in Jewish worship. Could there be a real-life version of the mythical “Yiddishland?”

“I don’t think there’s going to be a secular Yiddish community in which people live everyday lives in Yiddish,” Adrienne Cooper reluctantly admits. “But among artists there’s no reason this material can’t be taken up as a means of creative communication.”

New CD consists entirely of material that is either brand new or significantly re-imagined Yiddish songs
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