where the wild things are

Making Mischief Of One Kind. And Another.

Remembering Maurice Sendak, who sublimated his unhappy Brooklyn Jewish childhood into literary success.

05/08/2012
Staff Writer

‘Oh please don’t go — we’ll eat you up — we love you so!”

That’s what the Wild Things say to Max when he abandons them to return to his mother, and his supper. It’s an expression of grief that surely rings true to countless children and former children who woke May 8 to learn that Maurice Sendak, creator of “Where the Wild Things Are” and several other beloved children’s books had died earlier that day at 83 of complications from a recent stroke.

Sendak based the Wild Things on aunts and uncles who scared him as a child. Getty Images

On Maurcie Sendak, Adam Yauch, and the Death of Jewish Brooklyn Bohemia

If the death this weekend of Adam Yauch, 47—the Beastie Boys founder, nicknamed MCA—was not enough, today came another blow: the death of Maurice Sendak, at 83.  Both were Jewish artists, pioneers in their respective genres, and both were Brooklyn-born.  That they were born some 35 years apart, and came from worlds quite diff

Maurice Sendak: On Jews, Death, and "The Bulls--t of Innocence"

It shouldn’t come as a surprise that the author of the classic, sepulchral children’s book “Where the Wild Things Are” has something of a potty-mouth.  But still it feels like one.  Maurice Sendak, the 83-year-old author of “Wild Things, as well as a new children’s book, “Bumble-Ardy,” his umpteenth, gave what is to my mind one of the best interviews I’ve read in a long time. Anywhere.

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