Web

NoahPozner.com - Exploiting A Tragedy

When the names of the victims of the Sandy Hook Elementary School tragedy in Newtown, Connecticut were announced, Jewish media outlets immediately published articles about the youngest victim Noah Pozner, the 6-year-old who was laid to rest earlier this week in a traditional Jewish funeral.

Noah Pozner was the youngest of the 1st grade victims at the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting.

Ultra-Orthodox are Correct About the Dangers of the Internet

When I first heard that a rally was planned for Haredi (ultra-Orthodox) Jews to protest the Internet, I didn’t think it would attract much attention. After all, the Internet has long been under attack in Haredi communities and their rabbinic leaders have forbidden it in the past.

Facebook Won't Be Used to Publicize This Rally

If Al Gore actually did invent the Internet, as he once claimed, he would be the least popular guy in any ultra-Orthodox neighborhood. It is clear that the fervently Orthodox Jewish leaders really despise the Internet and technology because they're willing to spend over $1.5 million in a rally against it next month in Queens, New York.

Can One Sell Chametz Over the Internet?

On the Jewish Techs blog we have looked at the way several Jewish rituals are now performed using the Internet. Not every Jewish ritual can be transferred to the medium of the Internet, but even the question raises some interesting points for discussion.

Selling chametz on the Web has become standard operating procedure. But is it acceptable?

Dead Sea Scrolls: From Qumran Caves to Museums to the Web

After the Dead Sea Scrolls were discovered in a cave in Qumran in the winter of 1946–47 by Muhammed edh-Dhib, a Bedouin boy, and his cousin, it still took two decades until they were placed on display in a museum.

The Dead Sea Scrolls are now online thanks to Google

The Jerusalem Dog Stoning Hoax that Went Viral

 There are certain things that we all read on the Web that we find unbelievable. Not "unbelievable" as in "amazing," but events that simply cannot be believed. Some of these crazy things have actually occurred as reported, but many are simply hoaxes. Thank God for websites like Snopes.com to debunk these myths.

Haredi Orthodox Rabbis Ban Internet

Late last year, Haredi (ultra-Orthodox) rabbis banned the popular blog Voz Iz Neias and even went so far as to try to have it taken down. Now, FailedMessiah.com reports that the Agudath Israel of America's Moetzet Gedolei HaTorah has issued a ban prohibiting its adherents from using the Internet without a filter.

Internet is Forbidden for Ultra-Orthodox

Rabbi Tells Students Not to Comment on Blogs or Website Articles

The more I blog, the thicker my skin gets. Overtime, I've learned to prepare myself before reading the comment section at the bottom of my posts. With great inventions, we have to take the bad with the good. It's been wonderful that newspapers and magazines make their articles available to us on the Web, but it also means that individuals can post outrageous, defaming, and insulting comments underneath each article -- opinions that would never be published in a print edition.

Rabbi Shlomo Aviner says stay away from talkbacks and blog commenting

Chabad's Social Media Success

Chabad Lubavitch has always been out in front when it comes to using the Internet for publicity. Back in the 90's, Chabad took full advantage of the virtual communities on America Online (AOL) and then launched some of the most impressive websites once everyone migrated to the Web. For years, Chabad has been a strong force in Cyberspace with "Ask the Rabbi" websites, online distance learning, and viral videos.

The "Recovery Rabbi" Yisrael Pinson uses Twitter to fulfill his mission.

Bar Mitzvah Lessons in Cyberspace

Why shlepp your kid to the synagogue for her bat mitzvah lessons when she can dial in virtually?

A recent article in the New York Times shows how the tech savvy bar mitzvah tutors have taken to the Web to make the process more convenient for them and their students.

What will traditionalists make of Jewish kids getting their bar mitzvah lessons online?
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