U.S.

Jewish groups praise Iran sanctions passage, dovish groups split

My email inbox today has been chock full of statements from Jewish organizations and Capitol Hill politicians lauding final passage of the new, tougher Iran sanctions bill, and groups like AIPAC deserve a pat on the back for getting the legislation through a largely gridlocked Congress.

This from AIPAC:

Coming soon: a new Iran day of reckoning for pro-Israel groups?

Could pro-Israel leaders here face a grim day of reckoning on the issue of Iran's nuclear program?

Last week the UN Security Council passed new sanctions demanded by the Obama administration, which won the support of China and Russia – the biggest obstacles to a new sanctions regime. Congress seems poised to pass tougher U.S. sanctions targeting companies, individuals and states that deal with Iran's nuclear sector, JTA reports.

Pro-Israel, With Questions: Beinart Pins his Thesis to the Synagogue Door

05/26/2010
JTA

WASHINGTON (JTA) -- Peter Beinart attends an Orthodox synagogue, once edited The New Republic (the closest thing to a smicha for Jewish policy wonks) and backed Sen. Joe Lieberman’s quixotic 2004 bid to become the first Jewish president.

Which is why he’s always been counted among the Washington pundits who defend Israel, Zionism and the right of American Jews to lobby for a strong U.S.-Israel relationship.

Beinart also frets about how Jewish his kids will be.

What About The Arab States?

04/27/2010

There’s been a lot of talk in the media about the Obama administration’s push for indirect “proximity” talks between Israel and the Palestinians, with special envoy George Mitchell serving as facilitator, referee and cheerleader, and about Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s reluctant agreement to participate.
 
You hear much less about how the Palestinians and the Arab states haven’t been much help to the administration’s faltering efforts.
 

U.S.-Israel Tensions Now Hitting Pulpits

N.Y. area rabbis, some feeling ‘forced,’ wading into rocky political waters; anxiety seen in pews.

04/20/2010
Staff Writer

As the strain in U.S.-Israel relations continues, some area rabbis who generally don’t mix religion and politics on the pulpit are setting aside those constraints.

“People were asking me and my hand was sort of forced,” said Rabbi Perry Rank, spiritual leader of the Midway Jewish Center, a Conservative synagogue in Syosset, L.I. “My sense is that Mr. [Barack] Obama has unnerved the American Jewish community and people are looking for a perspective on the issue.

Rabbis Andrew Bachman and Perry Rank: Taking to pulpit, with differing views of Obama’s policies.

Mainstream Jewish Group Becomes First to Openly Criticize Obama U.S. Mideast Policy

 The World Jewish Congress has become the first mainstream Jewish organization to speak out against the Obama administration's recent treatment of Israel, scheduling full-page ads to appear in tomorrow's editions of the Wall Street Journal and Washington Post that criticize Washington for placing the Mideast impasse on Jerusalem.

New AJC Survey: No Big Swings in American Jewish Public Opinion

I haven't had a chance to fully digest the American Jewish Committee's 2010 survey of American Jewish public opinion, released today without any warning to unsuspecting Jewish newspaper editors. We've posted a JTA story on the release here.

But one number jumped out at me. When asked about President Barack Obama's handling of U.S.-Israel relations, 55 percent approved, 37 percent disapproved.

The New York Times’ gift to AIPAC on eve of policy conference

 AIPAC policy conferences – the annual pro-Israel extravaganzas meant to spotlight the power of the pro-Israel lobby group – are always the most interesting in presidential election years, or when they're a big fight brewing over U.S. foreign policy.

Cold Peace, Hot Tensions

01/02/2008
Israel Correspondent

Tel Aviv — Mutual recriminations between Israel and Egypt entered a second week over the illicit weapons trade through the tunnels under Gaza’s border with the Sinai peninsula.

Lauder’s Proposed Serb Deal Eyed

02/26/1999
Staff Writer

They first met through Benjamin Netanyahu, who brought them together when both were supporting his ultimately successful 1993 bid to lead Israel’s Likud Party.

But this week, the booming business partnership that emerged between philanthropist and media mogul Ronald Lauder and Netanyahu campaign official Itzhak Fisher in 1994 took a controversial turn.

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