United Nations

The Goldstone Rush

After the judge’s surprise mea culpa, Israel advocates hurry to undo the damage.

04/05/2011
Staff Writer

In the Book of Esther read on Purim, King Ahasuerus tells Queen Esther that he cannot revoke his edict calling for the destruction of the Jews but that he would issue a new decree allowing the Jews to defend themselves.

Israel’s consul for media affairs in New York, Joel Lion, offered similar advice this week to the American Jewish community following the surprise mea culpa by Richard Goldstone.

The retraction by Richard Goldstone, above, is a “teachable moment,” said a Jewish leader.

U.N. Human Rights Council: Goldstone Report Stands

04/05/2011

JERUSALEM (JTA) -- The United Nations Human Rights Council said it will continue to use the Goldstone Report as written, despite its author's retraction of a key finding.

Council spokesman Cedric Sapey told the Israeli daily Yediot Achronot on Monday that the Op-Ed written by Richard Goldstone appearing in The Washington Post of April 2 was his personal opinion and not that of the rest of the committee.

U.S. ‘Determined’ to Address Anti-Israel Bias at U.N. Human Rights Council

03/30/2011

 
March 30, 2011
WASHINGTON (JTA) -- The Obama administration said it remains determined to end anti-Israel bias at the United Nations Human Rights Council.

The State Department on Wednesday released a fact sheet outlining its accomplishments since rejoining the UNHRC in 2009.

At the time, pro-Israel groups and conservatives criticized the reversal of Bush administration policy of boycotting the council, saying it validated the council's almost near-exclusive focus on Israel.

Hamas to U.N.: Don’t Teach Holocaust

03/01/2011

JERUSALEM (JTA) -- Hamas said it will stop the United Nations from teaching Palestinian children in Gaza about the Holocaust.

The history of the Holocaust is set to become part of a human rights curriculum in Gaza schools run by the U.N. Relief and Works Agency that are attended by more than 200,000 Palestinian children, The Guardian reported.

Blogging J Street, just a little

I can't spend a lot of time at J Street's second national conference, going on now at Washington's cavernous Convention Center, but I was there yesterday as a panelist in a session on the Jewish vote and spent a little time shmoozing, and I've been watching the sessions streamed on the J Street Web site.

Assessing J Street

Since last week's story on J Street, several readers have asked about my assessment of how the group is doing after almost three tumultuous years.

A tale of shifting Jewish priorities

 

Here's a little insight into Jewish priorities these days that probably won't surprise you.

Last week I received at least 25 statements and press releases from Jewish groups and assorted Jewish politicians urging a U.S. veto of the UN General Assembly resolution condemning Israel's settlements. (The U.S. DID veto the resolution on Friday, and there's no evidence pressure from Jewish groups was the reason).

What the U.S. veto at the U.N. means

Does it matter much that the Obama administration vetoed a UN Security Council resolution labeling Israel's settlement activity illegal? Naturally, it depends on who you ask, but my answer is: probably not.

Mostly, it strikes me as an action by an administration that has concluded – rightly or wrongly – that the current status quo is the best it can hope for in the Middle East.

Netanyahu Thanks U.S. for Vetoing U.N. Resolution

02/20/2011

JERUSALEM (JTA) -- Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu thanked the United States for vetoing a United Nations Security Council resolution condemning Israel on settlements.

U.S. Vetoes U.N. Resolution on Settlements

02/18/2011
JTA

NEW YORK (JTA) -- The United States vetoed a U.N. resolution that would have condemned Israeli settlements as illegal.

The Security Council resolution, which was brought to a vote Friday afternoon, earned the support of the council's other 14 members.

The Obama administration, which opposes Israeli settlements, said raising the issue at the United Nations would only complicate efforts to reach a negotiated settlement.

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