Torah

‘Fifty Years Of History Destroyed In Minutes’

Yeshiva of Belle Harbor, Brighton Beach’s Mazel Day School suffer major damage in Sandy’s fury; other schools hit too.

11/02/2012
Associate Editor

UPDATE (NOV. 4): The Jewish Week has learned that, at an emergency meeting on Saturday night, a group of parents and organizations pledged to keep the Yeshiva of Belle Harbor operating, from a new location in Brooklyn. The school will no longer merge with the Crown Heights Yeshiva, but will be an independent school. Leaders plan to secure a location and open school there in the next few days. More details to follow on Monday.

 

Floodwaters in the halls of Brooklyn’s Mazel Day School

What the Doctor Ordered: Shabbat at Camp Ramah

07/12/2012
Jewish Week Online Columnist

One of my very favorite movies is Rob Reiner’s The Princess Bride , based on the classic novel by William Goldman. The movie is wonderful for a whole host of reasons, but essentially, it is a whimsical riff on the idea of “true love.” Wesley and Buttercup, the hero and heroine, endure all kinds of outrageous misfortune, but ultimately, their destiny is to be together.mTrue love wins out.

Rabbi Gerald C. Skolnik is the spiritual leader of the Forest Hills Jewish Center in Queens.

A Rebbe For A New Generation

06/05/2012
Special To The Jewish Week

Candlelighting, Readings:
Shabbat candles: 8:08 p.m.
Torah: Num 8:1-12:16
Haftarah: Zechariah 2:14-4:7
Havdalah: 9:16 p.m. 

The Jewish people seemed poised for entry into the Promised Land when suddenly the nation became a group of kvetchers, “The people were as murmurers, speaking evil in the ears of the Lord… saying ‘who will feed us meat? … Remember the fish which we ate in Egypt for free, the cucumbers, the watermelons, the onions and the garlic?’” [Numbers 11:1-5]

Rabbi Shlomo Riskin

The Unity Of God, Torah And Israel

05/15/2012
Special To The Jewish Week

Candlelighting, Readings:
Shabbat candles: 7:51 p.m.
Torah: Leviticus 25:1–27:34
Haftarah: Jeremiah 16:19-17:14
Havdalah: 8:58 p.m.                                                    

Rabbi Shlomo Riskin

The Tragedy Of Impossible Pluralism

05/01/2012
Special To The Jewish Week

Candlelighting, Readings:
Shabbat candles: 7:38 p.m.
Torah: Lev. 16:1-20:27
Haftarah: Amos 9:7-15 (Ashkenaz);
Ezekiel 20: 2-20 (Sephard)
Havdalah: 8:41 p.m

Rabbi Gidon Rothstein

A Kind Word About Unkind Words

04/24/2012
Special To The Jewish Week

Candlelighting, Readings:
Shabbat candles: 7:30 p.m.
Torah: Lev. 12:1-15:33
Haftarah: II Kings 7:3-20
Havdalah: 8:33 p.m.            
                                      

Nehemia Polen

The Bible, Take Two

The G-dcast team looking to bring its playful Torah videos to a wider audience of students and teachers.

Associate Editor
01/10/2012

With its lengthy roster of rules concerning animal sacrifice and food, Parshat Shemini is not generally considered a crowd pleaser.

But the text from Leviticus is such a favorite among Sarah Zollman’s fifth graders at Carmel Academy in Greenwich, Conn., that one student, upon learning it was to be her bat mitzvah Torah portion “was so excited.”

The G-dcast crew recording a video. Their work has garnered 1.5 million hits on YouTube.

A Revolutionary Torah

Shearith Israel scroll, with burn marks still on it, is centerpiece of New-York Historical Society’s reopening exhibit.

11/15/2011
Staff Writer

In August 1776, George Washington and his troops retreated to Manhattan Island. The British had just routed his rebel army in Long Island, and Washington tried desperately to hold onto what little perch of New York he could. But by November, the British expelled his army from Manhattan, which the British occupied throughout the Revolutionary war.

The Shearith Israel Torah scroll that was burned by the invading British army, in 1776.

Religion, Guilt And The Jewish Condition

Rabbi Gerald Skolnik

11/03/2011
Jewish Week Online Columnist

Through the years, I’ve grown reluctant to divulge my rabbinic identity to those whom I meet on vacation, or in a purely social context far away from work.

Rabbi Gerald Skolnik

Dead Sea Scrolls: From Qumran Caves to Museums to the Web

After the Dead Sea Scrolls were discovered in a cave in Qumran in the winter of 1946–47 by Muhammed edh-Dhib, a Bedouin boy, and his cousin, it still took two decades until they were placed on display in a museum.

The Dead Sea Scrolls are now online thanks to Google
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