Torah

A Rebbe For A New Generation

06/05/2012
Special To The Jewish Week

Candlelighting, Readings:
Shabbat candles: 8:08 p.m.
Torah: Num 8:1-12:16
Haftarah: Zechariah 2:14-4:7
Havdalah: 9:16 p.m. 

The Jewish people seemed poised for entry into the Promised Land when suddenly the nation became a group of kvetchers, “The people were as murmurers, speaking evil in the ears of the Lord… saying ‘who will feed us meat? … Remember the fish which we ate in Egypt for free, the cucumbers, the watermelons, the onions and the garlic?’” [Numbers 11:1-5]

Rabbi Shlomo Riskin

The Unity Of God, Torah And Israel

05/15/2012
Special To The Jewish Week

Candlelighting, Readings:
Shabbat candles: 7:51 p.m.
Torah: Leviticus 25:1–27:34
Haftarah: Jeremiah 16:19-17:14
Havdalah: 8:58 p.m.                                                    

Rabbi Shlomo Riskin

The Tragedy Of Impossible Pluralism

05/01/2012
Special To The Jewish Week

Candlelighting, Readings:
Shabbat candles: 7:38 p.m.
Torah: Lev. 16:1-20:27
Haftarah: Amos 9:7-15 (Ashkenaz);
Ezekiel 20: 2-20 (Sephard)
Havdalah: 8:41 p.m

Rabbi Gidon Rothstein

A Kind Word About Unkind Words

04/24/2012
Special To The Jewish Week

Candlelighting, Readings:
Shabbat candles: 7:30 p.m.
Torah: Lev. 12:1-15:33
Haftarah: II Kings 7:3-20
Havdalah: 8:33 p.m.            
                                      

Nehemia Polen

The Bible, Take Two

The G-dcast team looking to bring its playful Torah videos to a wider audience of students and teachers.

Associate Editor
01/10/2012

With its lengthy roster of rules concerning animal sacrifice and food, Parshat Shemini is not generally considered a crowd pleaser.

But the text from Leviticus is such a favorite among Sarah Zollman’s fifth graders at Carmel Academy in Greenwich, Conn., that one student, upon learning it was to be her bat mitzvah Torah portion “was so excited.”

The G-dcast crew recording a video. Their work has garnered 1.5 million hits on YouTube.

A Revolutionary Torah

Shearith Israel scroll, with burn marks still on it, is centerpiece of New-York Historical Society’s reopening exhibit.

11/15/2011
Staff Writer

In August 1776, George Washington and his troops retreated to Manhattan Island. The British had just routed his rebel army in Long Island, and Washington tried desperately to hold onto what little perch of New York he could. But by November, the British expelled his army from Manhattan, which the British occupied throughout the Revolutionary war.

The Shearith Israel Torah scroll that was burned by the invading British army, in 1776.

Religion, Guilt And The Jewish Condition

Rabbi Gerald Skolnik

11/03/2011
Jewish Week Online Columnist

Through the years, I’ve grown reluctant to divulge my rabbinic identity to those whom I meet on vacation, or in a purely social context far away from work.

Rabbi Gerald Skolnik

Dead Sea Scrolls: From Qumran Caves to Museums to the Web

After the Dead Sea Scrolls were discovered in a cave in Qumran in the winter of 1946–47 by Muhammed edh-Dhib, a Bedouin boy, and his cousin, it still took two decades until they were placed on display in a museum.

The Dead Sea Scrolls are now online thanks to Google

Religion and Social Media

With about a billion users between Facebook and Twitter alone, more topics than just Justin Bieber and Lady Gaga are being discussed on social media networks today. Religion is certainly one of them.

More users report using social media for religious purposes

Tattoos And Solidarity With Survivors

05/20/2011
Special to the Jewish Week

Q - I recall reading several years ago about a survivor's son who had engraved a tattoo on his arm to match the one borne by his father at Auschwitz. I understand that he meant it as a gesture of solidarity, but doesn't Jewish law prohibit tattoos?

Rabbi Joshua Hammerman
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