Thomas DiNapoli

Met Council's Rapfogel Facing Grand Larceny, Money Laundering Charges

Ousted CEO hoarded cash from insurance overpayments, says AG.

09/24/2013
Staff Writer
Story Includes Video: 
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William Rapfogel, the former head of one of the city’s most prominent social service agencies who was fired amid allegations of financial misconduct surrendered to the police on Tuesday, and will be face charges including grand larceny and money laundering, authorities said.

The scheme ensnaring the Metropolitan Council on Jewish Poverty may have spanned as long as two decades and involved millions of dollars, according to court papers. Rapfogel's compensation at the organization was about $417,000.

An investigator working for the attorney general, in the criminal comlaint, says he recovered more than $400,000 in cash from Rapfogel that was kept in his homes on three dates in August. 

Rapfogel, 58, long one of the city's best known charity executives, was released from the First Precinct in Lower Manhattan after posting $100,000 in bail, according to a spokesman for state Attorney General Eric Schneiderman, who investgated the case.  Rapfogel surrendered his passport after Judge Kevin McGrath ordered him not to leave the state.

Comptroller's Database To Aid Holocaust Heirs

04/05/2013
Staff Writer

New York State Comptroller Thomas DiNapoli has created a new link on his website to help the heirs of Jewish Holocaust victims claim money in the state’s unclaimed funds database.

An initial search of the site against the names of 50,000 Holocaust victims and survivors turned up 4,000 matches. Now, the state is asking those claimants to check the website and confirm that there is truly a match.

Comptroller Thomas DiNapoli: Searched 28 million accounts.

Fighting For Survivors

08/07/2012
Editorial

New York State Comptroller Thomas DiNapoli is offering to search the state’s unclaimed funds account to see if any of its nearly $12 billion belongs to Holocaust survivors or their heirs.

The money was in accounts that were turned over to the state by banks, brokerages and other financial institutions after years of inactivity. Some life insurance companies also turned over death benefits when they were unable to find the beneficiary.

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