theater

Yiddish Theater, On The Margin

10/31/2012 - 20:00

Little did the theater director David Herskovitz know, when he caught The Jewish Museum’s 2008 exhibit on Marc Chagall and the Russian Jewish Theater, that he would end up spending the next stage of his career staging forgotten Yiddish works. Herskovitz’s theater company, Target Margin, is discovering that rescuing Yiddish plays from oblivion can transform audiences’ expectations.

David Herskovitz

Kill The Jews — Satirically Speaking

04/30/2012 - 20:00
Special To The Jewish Week

Hannah Arendt was deadly serious when she coined the term “the banality of evil” to refer to the matter-of-factness with which the Nazis committed genocide. But in the hands of playwright Ken Kaissar, the contemplation of the mass murder of the Jews becomes a springboard for outrageous satire. His play, “A Modest Suggestion,” opens next week in Midtown, and it features Jeff Auer, Bob Greenberg, Ethan Hova, Russell Jordan, Jonathan Marballi and Robert W. Smith.

Scene from “A Modest Suggestion,” a satire of Swiftian proportions about the Holocaust.

A ‘Sassy’ Jewish Actress, Cured By Globetrotting

04/09/2012 - 20:00
Special To The Jewish Week

After a teacher told her she didn’t have the talent to succeed, Sivan Hadari, an American-Israeli actress who now lives in New York, traveled the world to free herself of debilitating self-doubt.

"Sivan Hadari's new one-woman play documents her journeys to the unlikeliest of places."

Jewish Theatre Of NY’s Latest Censored?

06/13/2011 - 20:00
Editorial Assistant

Tuvia Tenenbom is no stranger to controversy. He has staged plays about love letters to Hitler, Arab virgins being raped by Israeli soldiers and the sex lives of chasidic Jews.

But only recently did the U.S. State Department step in.

A Tunisian love triangle proves too controversial for the U.S. State Department.

Crying For Argentina

In 'Memory is a Culinary Affair,' a Jewish woman - the daughter of a 'desaparaceida' - struggles to rebuild her life in New York.
05/30/2011 - 20:00
Special to the Jewish Week

When we think of Jewish immigrants, many of us recollect those from Eastern Europe who came to New York around the turn of the 20th century. But the city continues to be a haven for Jewish immigrants from all over the world. In Graciela Berger Wegsman's "Memory is a Culinary Affair," a young Jewish woman from Argentina struggles to rebuild her life in New York as she grapples with her mother's disappearance at the hands of the military dictatorship in her country. The play opens next Thursday evening at the Red Room in the East Village.

Ydaiber Orozco and Mariana Parma as sisters in "Memory is a Culinary Affair."

A Night In Tunisia

05/16/2011 - 20:00
Special to the Jewish Week

Some wars are fought more in the bedroom than on the battlefield. In Tuvia Tenenbom’s new play, “Saida,” the aging leader of the Palestinian secret service (Robert Tekavec) and his young Israeli counterpart (Sergei Nagony) vie for the hand of Saida (Anita Clay), the most beautiful woman in Tunisia. An allegory for the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, “Saida” opened last weekend at the Kraine Theatre in the East Village. Jeffrey Coyne and Adam Shiri are also featured in the cast.

“Saida,” with Sergei Nagony, left, Robert Tekavec and Anita Clay, is meant as a metaphor about Israeli-Palestinian relations.

The Most Goyish Tony Awards Ever?

The 2011 Tony Awards were announced this morning, and an admittedly shallow reading of the nominees suggests that it just might be least Jewish year on Broadway ever.  In fact, it might just be the most Christian the Tony's has ever been: "The Book of Mormon," "Sister Act" and the notoriously anti-semitic "Merchant of Venice" all stand out in the major categories. 

Guess Who’s Coming To (Shabbos) Dinner?

02/28/2011 - 19:00

The question of whether people can escape their fate is at the center of Chana Porter’s new play, “Besharet” (the Yiddish word for destiny). In the play, the inaugural production of AliveWire Theatrics, an encounter with the supernatural upends the lives of a Jewish attorney and his wife, causing deeply submerged memories and feelings to erupt. “Besharet” opens this weekend at P.S. 122 in the East Village.

Olivia Rorick, MacLeod Andrews and William Green in scene from “Besharet.”

Matthew Lopez’s Ambivalent Seder

‘Whipping Man’ playwright discusses what the Passover meal says about freedom and redemption.
02/21/2011 - 19:00
Special To The Jewish Week

Passover is, for many of us, an unequivocally joyful holiday. The tablecloth is set with fine china and sparkling silverware, the children are freshly scrubbed, and the seder rejuvenates us with its theme of freedom and rebirth.

Jay Wilkison, André Braugher and André Holland in the pivotal scene from Matthew Lopez’s “The Whipping Man.”

Meyer Levin’s ‘Obsession’

Two current plays look at the writer’s quest to dramatize Anne Frank’s diary.
02/14/2011 - 19:00
Special To The Jewish Week

He was one of the leading literary lights of the 20th century, but it was another writer’s work that became the object of his obsession. Meyer Levin was a prolific Jewish writer who struggled fruitlessly for three decades to get the world to pay attention to his play about Anne Frank. Now, three decades after his death, Levin finally gets his due with two different plays about his quest on view simultaneously in New York.

Anne Frank, as puppet, and Mandy Patinkin in scene from "Compulsion."
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