texting

Texting on Rosh Hashanah

There was undoubtedly more texting in shul this Rosh Hashanah than in past years. In most liberal congregations, texting was likely done as discreetly as possible, often with a cellphone hidden low in one's lap. In some congregations it might have been more overtly outside in the lobby or perhaps outside the synagogue building.

Is it tactful to text during Rosh Hashanah services?

`Half Shabbos' Article Triggers Full Range Of Responses

There was nothing halfway about the response to our article this week on Orthodox teens who refer to their seeming addiction to Shabbat texting as keeping “Half Shabbos.”

Soon after it was posted online Tuesday evening and before the print edition was delivered, the story went viral, prompting dozens of comments on our website as well as many more on various blogs.

It’s the fault of pampered kids, indulgent parents, clueless teachers; you name it.

For Many Orthodox Teens, ‘Half Shabbos’ Is A Way Of Life

Texting on Saturdays seen as increasingly common ‘addiction.’

06/22/2011
Staff Writer

At a recent campgrounds Shabbaton sponsored by a local Modern Orthodox high school, the teenage participants broke into small groups after the meals, as is usual, to talk with their friends.

On their cell phones.

Of the 17 students who attended the weekend program, said 17-year-old Julia, a junior at the day school, most sent text messages on Shabbat – a violation of the halachic ban on using electricity in non-emergency situations.

For teens from a wide range of Orthodox backgrounds, a new norm.  Jewish Week Illustration/Photo by Michael Datikash
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