Tech

Google Glass and Jewish Education

In 1982 when I was in first grade at Hillel Day School, a Jewish day school in Metropolitan Detroit, my father brought in our family’s Apple II computer for show-and-tell. There were no computers in the school at that time so it was a seminal technological moment for the school. I’m sure my father figured he would blow my classmates minds by showing them how to type a few lines of the LOGO programming language and get the turtle cursor to turn and move across the screen. However, my peers didn’t have any mind-blowing experiences that day -- it was only the beginning of what our generation would come to expect from computers and technology.

Hillel Fuld, a technology evangelist in Israel, tries Google Glass. Photo courtesy Hillel Fuld

Omer Counting in the Digital Age

Jewish Day Schools and Technology: Trying to Strike the Right Balance

I still remember the time in 1st grade when my father brought our Apple II Plus into the classroom in an effort to show my classmates the wonders of Turtle Graphics. It was 1982 and each little 1st grader waited in line to get a chance to touch the odd looking keyboard and try to make the little turtle move. My father beamed with pride as he watched each child get their three-minute opportunity to try to program the blinking green turtle cursor to move across the black screen.

Technology in the schools has advanced from blackboards and graphing paper to SMART Boards and tablets.

Are You An Accidental Techie?

The Covenant Foundation's executive director Harlene Appelman has apparently taught a new term to the founder of Darim Online, Lisa Coltin (@lisacoltin). The term is The Positive Deviant and learning that term has led Lisa to blog about another interesting term that techies are throwing around these days: "The Accidental Techie". Here's what Lisa posted on the Darim blog, JewPoint0:

Lisa Coltin describes how "Accidental Techies" are shaping the field of Jewish education in synagogues?
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