Tea party

Ky. Senate race called for Rand Paul; Big Problem for Jewish GOPers?

Update: CNN is calling the Delaware Senate race for Democrat Chris Coons, who apparently will beat Republican/Tea Party darling Christine O'Donnell. That's better news for the Republican Jewish Coalition, which also refused to endorse her candidacy.

In the non-surprise of the evening, libertarian/Tea Party favorite Rand Paul looks like an easy winner in the Kentucky Senate race.

This isn't good news for Jewish Republicans, who otherwise seem poised to have a pretty good night. The Republican Jewish Coalition conspicuously spurned Paul as being outside the GOP mainstream.

Election 2010: The Jewish Democratic View

Jewish Values are Democratic Values.

During the last Presidential election, Jewish voters made a significant difference in helping put Democrats back in power. We came out in full force to show the country that Democratic values are truly Jewish values. This election cycle our core beliefs are again being challenged by a Republican Party that continues to move further and further to the right. On November 2, we one again have a chance to make an impact on the outcome of key races.

NJDC president and CEO David A. Harris

Election Day: One Party Will Protect Me, One Party Won't


Here's something to think about on Election Day. One party is Congress is almost always for Israel, one is not. Guess which?

'Meathead' makes Holocaust comparison, and why we need a serious study of this rhetoric

Why do they do it?

Now the Anti-Defamation League is going after film actor and producer Rob "Meathead" Reiner,  who likened the Tea Party movement – which has been wrist-slapped for it's own numerous Holocaust comparisons - to the Nazis.

Election 2010: More Anger, More Close Races Than Ever


WASHINGTON (JTA) -- Talk to veteran campaign watchers about this year’s congressional races, and within seconds they will tell you that they've never before seen elections quite like these.

Jewish Officials Prepare for Possible GOP Congressional Wins


WASHINGTON (JTA) -- Across the United States, Jewish community professionals are honing their skills of suasion, preparing to deal with a new crop of lawmakers who are unfamiliar with Jewish organizational priorities -- and who are likely to be unenthusiastic once they’re in the know.

This season of anti-incumbent sentiment, much of it swelling from the political right, presents the likelihood of a Republican takeover of at least one house of Congress. The GOP needs 39 seats to win in the House of Representatives; pollsters are predicting gains of 17 to 80 seats.

Republican Jewish Coalition repudiates another GOP candidate, Barbara Boxer wins 'Wing Nut' honors

Jewish Republicans are lining up to disavow one of their party's congressional candidates - Rich Iott, who's running for a House seat in Ohio and is a “tea party favorite,” according to the Atlantic, which broke the story.

More on Tea Parties and the Jews: new survey data complicates things

My story this week on Jewish Republicans and the Tea Parties is generating a lot of talk. And some of it is about stuff I missed, or didn't get to because of space.

A number of correspondents challenged the claim by Tea Party activists that this is all about fiscal responsibility, not at all about the “values agenda” issues that have traditionally made most Jewish voters nervous.

A new poll supports their contention; according to the Public Religion Research institute, rank-and-file Tea Partiers are pretty much indistinguishable from the Christian right core constituency.

Jewish Republicans Seen On Edge About Tea Party

As movement gains steam and plans minority outreach, concern in GOP circles.
Washington Correspondent

As the Tea Party wave sweeps across the nation’s political waters, Jewish Republicans are increasingly worried that the movement could wash away their hopes of winning over Jewish voters — even as leaders of the insurgency talk about expanded outreach to minorities, including Jews.

GOP Senate candidates Rand Paul and Christine O’Donnell may not play well with Jewish voters, experts say.

Tea Party Invites Concerns


It’s no secret that Americans are furious about an economy mired in unemployment, a federal deficit that will burden our children and grandchildren, big money lobbying run amok and political paralysis in Washington. This year’s Tea Party insurgency reflects those legitimate concerns.

But history teaches that such movements — leaderless, unstructured and built on a foundation of rage — can turn to scapegoating and vilification, with Jews being a traditional target.

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