Blogs

Does Israel Have A Culture Of Corruption?

Israel is beginning to look like old time Chicago politics.  The previous governor of Illinois, a former Chicago congressman, is in jail, home to four of the last seven governors of Illinois, and another popular former Chicago congressman is in jail now, with his wife, a former city alderman, going in when he gets out.  They’re only the latest in a long list of former Chicago area politicians to go to prison for corruption.

Blocking An Iran Deal Could Backfire

The Republican demand for a Congressional vote on any nuclear deal with Iran could come back and bite them on election day. 

In the intensely polarized political atmosphere engulfing Washington these days, it is unlikely Republicans would approve anything Barack Obama negotiated, even if it was a total unconditional Iranian surrender. 

The Congress can hold hearings about on executive agreement with Iran, but unlike a treaty, it does not require Senate approval. 

I Am Vengeance. I Am The Night. I Am... Jewish?

Through an accident of fate (and plot holes), could Batman have just been made a member of the tribe?

Batwoman #25 (art by Trevor McCarthy, Jim Fern, Tom Nguyen, Jay Leisten, Patrick Olliffe, Andrea Mutti). Via AfterEllen.com

Praying For Peace Like Talking To A Wall

Pope Francis should have learned in his visit last week to the West Bank and then to Jerusalem that praying for peace between Israelis and Palestinians is like talking to a wall. But he’s not one to give up easily, so he invited Israeli President Shimon Peres and Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas to come to the Vatican on June 8 to seek divine intervention.

That may be the best hope for peace, and that’s a very sad commentary. 

The 10 Commandments Of Inclusion

With Shavuot coming up we remember the time when the Jewish people were given the Ten Commandments. 

Biblical commentators say, “All Israel is responsible for one another” (kol Israel arevim zeh leh zeh). Yet we could be doing so much more to include people with disabilities in our communities. 

Accessibility in action. Courtesy of Beit Issie Shapiro

Hearing Lightning And Seeing Thunder: Judaism Is Accessible

Tuesday evening begins the holy days of Shavout, the moment of receiving Torah at Mount Sinai. Revelation at Sinai is the first, and largest, act of religious equality in history. Many other cultures and religions experience the divine in the same way they experience the world around them – as a hierarchy, a society divided by class or title. The Revelation at Mt. Sinai is open to all – regardless of status, gender, power, or lack of power. All the individuals at Sinai are equal.

Rabbi Daniel Grossman

Preparing For Shavuot: Reliving The Sinai Experience

We could celebrate Shavuot as we just celebrated Memorial Day: with ceremonies, a day off from work and a festive meal.   Our tradition urges us to celebrate Shavuot in a more spiritual manner, by recreating the experience of standing at Mount Sinai to receive the Torah.

Rabbi Michael Levy

Gained In Translation

"Jerusalem is a port city on the shore of eternity," wrote poet Yehuda Amichai." Last week, contemporary Israeli writers and translated-into-Hebrew international writers sailed into the Fourth International Writers Festival in Jerusalem for conversations, encounters, music and films that were articulate, bracing, confrontational, moving and at times inspirational.

Nicole Krauss. Yossi Zamir/International Writers Festival

Sexual Violence, Art And The Shoah

Israeli artist Gil Yefman takes on the subject of sexual violence and the forced prostitution of women during the Shoah, a focus not often presented in Holocaust history, and he does so through a literal hook, the crochet hook.

Gil Yefman.Tumtum, 2012.Knitting and other materials, including sound and performance art. Courtesy of Ronald Feldman Fine Arts

Creative Accommodations: Including People Who Are Deaf In The Jewish Community

Editor's Note: Alexis Kasher, the current president of the Jewish Deaf Resource Center, recently shared her personal experiences and perspectives on inclusion for people who are deaf in the Jewish community at the Foundation for Jewish Camping conference. New Normal editor Gabrielle Kaplan-Mayer interviewed Kashar about the conference.

NN: What is your experience of inclusion for people who are deaf in the Jewish community?
AK: I spent many years practicing civil rights and special education law. My practice focused on the civil and education rights of people who are deaf and hard of hearing or with disabilities. Laws are in place to protect their rights; however, enforcement is still an issue. It has been many years since the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and various federal special education laws was passed but we still have a ways to go before we are at 100 percent compliance. The truth is, once we are at 100 percent compliance, we will have achieved universal design that will benefit everyone. For instance, imagine how strollers would get around without curb cuts and how we could watch the Super Bowl in a noisy public place without closed captioning. However, for the most part religious organizations are exempt from compliance with the ADA. 

Alexis Kashar
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