Blogs

Siddur It Yourself: BBYO's Build a Prayer Site

When it comes to Jewish prayer, there are two schools of thought: keva and kavannah. Keva means "rote" and refers to the fixed prayers that are set forth in the siddur (Jewish prayer book), while kavvanah is the free and spontaneous inner devotion of the individual.

Jewish groups silent on finance regulatory reform, and an interesting dilemma for the Tea Partiers

Isn't it interesting how Jewish groups with a lot to say about almost everything have been so conspicuously silent about the politically charged debate in Washington on regulatory reform intended to prevent a recurrence of the financial meltdown whose impact is still being felt – by many Jewish organizations, as well as countless individuals?

Report from Haiti: Jews making a difference

This is one of those Jewish organizations that's still pretty much under the radar, but ultimately may be as important  to our communal future as all those communal powerhouses with fancy their acronyms and megabucks contributors.

Repair the World was created last year to "inspire American Jews and their communities to give their time and effort to serve those in need," according to its Web site "We aim to make service a defining part of American Jewish life."

Google Doodle for Israel

Google.com's logo has quickly become one of the most recognizable corporate logos. It also has been changed more than any other logo, sometimes even daily.

Must Reading: Aaron David Miller on 'The False Religion of Mideast Peace'

I've always regarded Aaron David Miller as one of the smartest, most thoughtful U.S. peace processors. Since he left the State Department a few years back, he's been one of my favorite analysts for the simple reason that his take on the Middle East doesn't flow from hardened ideology but from long experience and a willingness to constantly reevaluate old assumptions.

Call most Middle East analysts about the crisis du jour, and you know in advance what they're going to say; calling Miller often produces interesting journalistic surprises.

Bag Lady’s Guide to Romance

It says something about me that on a Saturday evening in Jerusalem, about an hour before sunset, when I stepped outdoors to take my dog for a walk I couldn't for the life of me figure out just who all these people were and where, exactly, they were going.

And then it dawned on me: It wasn't the good townspeople of Anatevka fleeing a pogrom but rather Torah-observers, dressed in their Sabbath best, hurrying to shul to daven mincha/maariv.

What kind of a Jew am I, anyway?

Update on Israel's iPad Ban

The Blogosphere has been abuzz about the news that Israel banned the Apple iPad from its borders until an acceptable international version which meets European specifications is released.

Israel-Apple-iPad-Ban

When Intermarriages Get 'Hit By A Bus'

My friend Laurel Snyder, editor of “Half/Life: Jew-ish Tales from Interfaith Homes” and author of numerous children’s books, has a thoughtful piece out this week on Killing The Buddha about intermarriage, divorce and the Reyes case. 

Laurel who, like me, has divorced parents and is herself intermarried, explores a lot of the same issues I’ve been thinking about (some elaborated on a column to be published in next week’s Jewish Week), vis a vis how interfaith issues play out when marriages implode. In emphasizing how she advises interfaith couples to discuss their differences before they become problems, she writes

Rush Hour Crush

I saw the cutie again on the bus this morning.

The one with the curly hair cropped short and the serious, worried face that reminds me of Jonathan Richman.

Sigh. How Jonathan Richman used to make my heart go pitter-pat during my college days when I would rush to see him in live shows and push to the front of the stage the better to see his fancy hip moves and crazy rhymes and forlorn longing.

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