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Boston Globe Corrects Its Coverage Of Brandeis-Oren Story

This is the Globe's coverage of Ambassador Michael Oren's commencement address at Brandeis University (May 23). The Globe now has added a correction and editor's note:

Jewish groups praise Iran sanctions passage, dovish groups split

My email inbox today has been chock full of statements from Jewish organizations and Capitol Hill politicians lauding final passage of the new, tougher Iran sanctions bill, and groups like AIPAC deserve a pat on the back for getting the legislation through a largely gridlocked Congress.

This from AIPAC:

Will Women-Only Torah Study Soon Become Old-School?

The most remarkable aspect of the first full-time co-ed learning program just ending at the Drisha Institute for Jewish Education, a pioneer in advanced Torah study for women, is how unremarkable it felt.

I visited the experimental program for college and graduate students spending the month of June in a “student immersion program” that combined Talmud and philosophy in examining “the relationship between spirituality and community involvement and action,” according to the program description.

“Radical centrism” and the Jewish community

Does hyper-polarized America need a new “radical centrism” to get us past the stale ideologies of both right and left and the resulting national paralysis?

Speaking Frankly, About Anne

Though it only got a brief mention in today's New York Times, the attacks on a soon-to-be-published novel about Anne Frank have received considerable more play in England.  The Sunday Times of London broke--or rather, made--the news when it got Gillian Walnes, a member of the Anne Frank Trust, to publicly criticize Sharon Dogar's upcoming Anne Frank-inspired novel.  Walnes took issue with a section in the book, to be titled "Annexed," where Peter van Pels, a boy in the attic who Anne lived with, expresses romantic feelings for Anne. "I don't understand why this story has to be sexualised," Walnes told London's Sunday Times.

It looks like this latest kerfuffle will take its place in the long list of woes surrounding Anne Frank's legacy. It's worth remembering that Frank's diary, published by her father Otto, in 1947, two years after his 15-year-old daughter died in Bergen-Belsen, has always attracted controversy.  In last year's "Anne Frank: The Book, The Life and the Afterlife," Francine Prose showed how even Otto tried to sanitize Anne's writing, cutting out the parts where Anne belittled her mother or talked about her period.

There's a Kosher App for That

As someone who not only keeps kosher, but also works as a mashgiach (kosher supervisor), I often find myself away from the computer and searching for kosher food options. There are two good iPhone apps that help users locate the closest kosher options, whether it's a box of cereal or an Italian restaurant you're looking for .

RustyBrick's kosher app links to the largest kosher database on the web at the Shamash site. With over 2,000 restaurants in the database, the Jewish Kosher App for the iPhone or iPod Touch looks up the nearest kosher place to eat from your current location, using the iPhone's GPS features. (If GPS or localization isn't on or available, a location or name can be typed in.) Additionally, a kosher symbols database is available to quickly look up what kosher symbols are backed by which organizations or rabbi. As a bonus feature, all of the food blessings and prayers in Hebrew are included in this app so one can give proper thanks before and following the meal.

Another new iPhone app to help the kosher eater locate food is called My Grocery Master. It allows users to browse and search a database of over 100,000 Kosher, gluten-free and lactose-free items across the United States, meeting the user’s lifestyle and dietary requirements. Created by Nosh Maven LLC, My Grocery Master enables people following kosher diets to find acceptable food near their location.

 

New Apps Locate Kosher Fare

Treif Steak Knives For The Hubby

 I grew up in an uber-secular home where pork chops and shrimp were served regularly, but for a brief period I toyed with the idea of keeping a kosher kitchen.

That fell by the wayside. Now the only dietary law I uphold in the house is that no shellfish can be cooked on Shabbat. (Send on the outraged comments, I’m ready for them!)

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