Blogs

What Not To Do On A Dating Sabbatical

Technically, I'm on a dating sabbatical.

Which means the next couple of weeks are all about getting in touch with the inner me. The "me" inside the "me," if you know what I mean. The "me" that is wearing a very teeny-tiny pair of glasses.

So, to be technical, I wasn't really breaking my sabbatical when a girlfriend called to update me on the set-up she had orchestrated.  I mean, she was the one who called me!

The Jewish Week Interviews Congressional Candidate Reshma Saujani

Adam Dickter interviews congressional candidate Reshma Saujani, who is challenging Rep. Carolyn Maloney of the East Side in September's Democratic primary.

The Times Admits, Not All Settlements Are Settlements

Readers sometimes wonder whether it is worthwhile to write to the Times (or to any paper, including The Jewish Week) regarding slights by reporters covering Israel.

In Which We Devote Far Too Much Space To Analyzing A Really Strange Essay

I don’t know how Elizabeth Cohen’s bizarre and disturbing piece in Tablet about a group of intermarried Jewish women who “gather for Shabbat but pack away their identities” escaped my notice, but thanks to InterfaithFamily.com’s Ed Case for directing my attention to it.

There is something kind of odd and overwrought about the essay, which, to judge by the comments it’s attracting, some readers are interpreting as a cautionary tale about the perils of intermarriage.

Different takes on the Netanyahu - Obama summit

Lots of different perspectives on yesterday's Netanyahu – Obama summit, but still not a lot of information about what happened behind closed doors.

Netanyahu - Obama summit: who won, who lost?

Tonight's Israeli newspapers are touting President Obama's promise to Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu that the U.S. will press for “direct” talks between Israel and the Palestinians as soon as possible instead of the indirect “proximity” talks now underway.

This is supposedly a victory for Netanyahu, who in news stories leading up to today's White House summit was portrayed as putting direct talks at the top of his Washington wish list, but I wonder; is that what he really wants?

Netanyahu in Washington, Part 1

 U.S.-Israel summits are generally pretty predictable affairs, but today's Barack Obama – Benjamin Netanyahu meeting takes the honey cake.

A kiss-and-make-up session, we learned weeks ago. A chance for Netanyahu to demonstrate all the “unprecedented” things he's done to advance the peace process, to use a word that pro-Israel groups here can't seem to get enough of. An opportunity for Obama, chastened by the intense political reaction to his earlier dealing with Netanyahu, to show he's a nice guy who really likes Israel and can get along with Netanyahu.

Why Israel Surrenders: The Blackmailer's Paradox

Prof. Robert (Yisrael) Aumann, the 2005 Nobel Prize winner in economics for his work on "game theory" analysis (see his excellent accceptance speech here), was born in Germany only to have emigrated two weeks before Kristallnacht. He has often applied game theory to the Israel-Arab conflict, exploring the reasons why Israel seems to be negotiating its surrender rather than a serious and lasting peace.

A Jerusalem Love Story, Minus the Love

I finally finished the A.B. Yehoshua novel I was reading, which freed me up to read the Meyer Levin novel I found at my favorite used bookstore in Jerusalem. Titled, The Spell of Time: a Tale of Love in Jerusalem, its subtitle was inspiring, if you know what I mean. 

In other words, I was hoping this tale of love in Jerusalem would rub off on me.

Beyond that, Meyer Levin was a Chicagoan, or, as Augie March would say, he was an “American, Chicago born.”  Me, too! Or rather, I am an American, Waukegan, Illinois, born.  But why split hairs?

Presbyterian Church working to undercut Israeli-Palestinian peace efforts?

If the Presbyterian Church (USA), which is meeting in Minneapolis this week, really cares about peace in the region it will soundly reject the latest report by its Middle East Study Committee.

This isn't about the frustrating search for some way to end the Middle East conflict; it's about a handful of determined Church activists with a serious grudge against the Jewish state, who don't much care that their churlish activism in the guise of religious morality is just making peace harder to attain.

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