Blogs

Time To Reexamine US-Turkey Relations

Turkey took another step away from democracy and closer to becoming an extremist Islamist state and patron of terrorists this week when Recep Tayyip Erdogan became the country's first elected president.

He has said he wants to build a "new Turkey" that will respect the diverse views of his nation, but he is the one most responsible for the deep divisions that plague it and damaging its international standing. 

Eikev: To Be Like God, Love The Stranger

I recently had the opportunity to deliver a shiur on the topic of inclusion of people with disabilities. As a model for a Torah approach to this issue, I looked at the mitzvot relating to the ger. One of those mitzvot occurs in Parshat Eikev, the mitzvah to love the "ger," or stranger:

Love you therefore the stranger, for you were strangers in the land of Egypt (Devarim, 10:19).

Rabbi Dov Linzer

Soldiers With Autism Bring Special Skills To The IDF

For the past few weeks, most of us have been glued to the news and social media to keep ourselves updated on the war in Israel. Some of us have friends and family in Israel, while others are torn by watching young soldiers go off to war. 

As I explored the web looking for information about the war, I came across a press release by the IDF that discusses Special Intelligence Unit 9900. This small unit includes soldiers with autism “who have remarkable visual and analytic capabilities. They can detect even the smallest details, undetectable to most people”.

Dr. Frances Victory

Loving Thy Neighbor, In Word And Deed

Since we moved into our house 14 years ago, our next door neighbors have been the Hellers. They were an older, semi-retired couple; we were a younger, just-starting-out couple. Nonetheless, they were there to greet us with hanging plants and gardening advice when we first moved in, to admire our kids as they arrived, one and one and two at a time, and then to introduce their grandchildren as playmates to our brood.

As our eldest son’s autism became more pronounced, the Hellers were models of tolerance and love.

The author's son Avi at camp. Courtesy of Michael Steinhart

Hamas Declares Victory

Hamas said it won the war and forced Israel to retreat because it couldn't wipe out Hamas. 

It agree to a three-day ceasefire that was supposed to end this installment of the on-going Israel-Gaza wars but when Israel refused to surrender to its demands, the terrorist group let the pause expire and resumed firing rockets and mortars into Israel.  Naturally, the renewed violence was all Israel's fault, a Hamas spokesman said, because the Zionists wouldn't meet Hamas's conditions.  

Gaza's Unanswered Questions

As Israeli, Palestinian and Egyptian negotiators in Cairo try to come up with a long-term truce, all know that they are just buying time until the next Gaza war.

This latest round left a very high body count and a lot of unanswered questions. 

Va-et-chanan: Personal Prayer, A Sanctuary With No Barriers

I grew up attending Temple BethEl in Asbury Park, New Jersey. Worship was a group activity. We recited the liturgy together, sometimes in response to the rabbi.

Communal worship binds Jews together. Parts of the liturgy, such as the Kedusha and Kaddish, may be recited only in a minyan, a gathering of ten adult Jews.

For some of us with disabilities, praying with a community is difficult. The synagogue may be inaccessible. Individuals who process verbal and written language differently from the “average congregant” might struggle to find and maintain their place in the prayerbook, keep pace with other worshippers, and switch between Hebrew and English.

Bridging Middle East Borders At The Fringe

With the 2014 New York International Fringe Festival upon us, one play stands out among the rest.  Meron Langsner’s “Over Here,” presented by Mortal Folly Theatre, depicts an unlikely friendship between a Palestinian-American and an Israeli immigrant in the rubble of the Twin Towers.

Meron Langsner. Allison McDonough

Ruderman Prize Profile: Thirty Years Of Inclusion And Going Strong At The St. Paul JCC

Editor's Note: In July, the Ruderman Family Foundation awarded five prizes to agencies across the world that are making the Jewish community into a more inclusive one. The New Normal will profile each of these amazing agencies over the next month. Click here to read last week’s profile.

The goal of the St. Paul JCC’s Inclusion and Accessibility Services Program (IAS) is to provide children, teens and adults with physical, cognitive and developmental disabilities the opportunity to be welcomed and fully participate in any and all programs offered by the JCC. The staff work with participants who need extra support and accommodations in numerous programs including: theater, swimming lessons, personal training, fitness programs, adult and youth programs. They have been dedicated to inclusive programming for the last thirty years. The program began in 1984 when parents came together and asked the JCC to create inclusive programming for their children, twelve in total, who had physical and developmental disabilities. One year later, the program doubled to support twenty-four children and has steadily grown in the years since.

A JCC participant paints an Elijah's Cup. Courtesy of the St. Paul JCC

Is This The World's Dumbest Question?

Jose Diaz-Balart this morning on his daily MSNBC show came up with one of the dumbest questions ever asked on cable television. 

Interviewing one of his network's reporters in Gaza about the breakdown of the Israel-Hamas ceasefire, the capture of an IDF soldier and the ongoing artillery and rocket exchanges playing out in the background, Diaz-Balart wanted to know, "How do you describe the ambiance there?"

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