Directions

East (And West) Of Eden

Singles are discovering that, yes, there is life beyond the Upper West Side. From the boroughs to Teaneck, is geography
really dating destiny?

Special To The Jewish Week
12/07/2010

Call it The Great Singles Migration. OK, Almost Great.

Liz Wallenstein is one of the new émigrés. The 31-year-old psychotherapist lived in both Washington Heights and the Upper West Side before moving to Flatbush, a Brooklyn neighborhood known more for its kosher pizza options than for an active singles scene.

“I wasn’t in love with the West Side,” said Wallenstein. “I had been there for four years. I felt like I was there because I didn’t know where else to be.

Liz Wallenstein: “I wasn’t in love 	with the West Side.”

First Nights

From tried-and-true to hip-and-trendy, these dating venues hit the spot.

Special To The Jewish Week
12/07/2010

During that first hour alone with Jeremy, I wasn’t sure of his intentions. He’d suggested we meet at a café. Was romance brewing — or only coffee?

The hip and the frum rub elbows at Basil in Crown Heights.

Tuesday, The Rabbi Went Out

The largely uncharted (an unspoken-of) territory of being single in the clergy.

Special To The Jewish Week
12/07/2010

There’s probably not another profession, outside of royalty, where the spouse gains a title upon marriage. Even if the traditional role of the rabbi’s spouse, or rebbetzin, has changed considerably in this generation, there’s still recognition of the supporting role a spouse might play, publicly and privately. (And there’s no name yet for the husband of a female rabbi, but plenty of playful attempts like rebbitz-sir).

All It Takes Is One

Managing Editor
12/07/2010

With its size and sizzle, New York is a singles paradise. Here, grazing your shoulder on the packed 1 train; there, peering at you from behind a folded Times in line at the Angelika, a soul mate calls. Multiply that close encounter by — what? — a million. A gambler — or a single guy or gal — would take those odds.

Directions December 2010

A New York Romance: Jewish Singles Today, Loving and Longing. Single rabbis looking for love; best first-date spots; to be young, gifted, Orthodox -- and divorced.

Staff Writer
12/07/2010
Directions December 2010

Endless Highway

12/08/2009
Managing Editor

“Away, I’m bound away,  ‘Cross the wide Missouri.” — “Shenandoah,” American folk song

'A Web of Affection'

12/17/2008
Managing Editor

E.B. White, the lyrical New Yorker writer and children’s book author, knew a thing or two about heroes, especially the unsung kind. He knew the power of the small, yet profound, human gesture, the tender mercies extended from one person to another in need. And he suggested that in the realm of human relations, only one metaphor really mattered: the web. Our differences aside, we are all tethered to one another, as if to a web, tied by invisible — even mystical — strands. Heroes understand this more clearly than the rest of us.

Downtown: A Tale Of Redemption

01/02/2008
Managing Editor

In a high-lonesome twang right out of the piney woods of the Ozarks, rock and roll Americanist Levon Helm sings of “a sorrow in the wind / blowin’ down the road I’ve been / I can hear it cry while shadows steal the sun.” Helm was the soulful, Arkansas-raised drummer in the pioneering ‘60s roots rock group The Band, and the song is an old gospel tune “Wide River to Cross” on his new CD, “Dirt Farmer.” It’s a prayer, really, a poignant hymn to loss but also a declaration that life rambles on, that “I’m only halfway home,

Endless Highway

12/08/2009
Managing Editor

“Away, I’m bound away,  ‘Cross the wide Missouri.” — “Shenandoah,” American folk song

'A Web of Affection'

12/17/2008
Managing Editor

E.B. White, the lyrical New Yorker writer and children’s book author, knew a thing or two about heroes, especially the unsung kind. He knew the power of the small, yet profound, human gesture, the tender mercies extended from one person to another in need. And he suggested that in the realm of human relations, only one metaphor really mattered: the web. Our differences aside, we are all tethered to one another, as if to a web, tied by invisible — even mystical — strands. Heroes understand this more clearly than the rest of us.

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