Arts Preview

Theater List

09/03/2014

“The Mitzvah.” Half-Jews in Hitler’s army are the subject of Roger Grunwald’s one-man play, which will be presented Sunday, Sept. 7, at 1 p.m. in the Student Union of Queensborough Community College, 222-05 56th Avenue in Bayside. To RSVP, call (718) 281-5770 or email MLBerman@qcc.cuny.edu.

The Things They Discarded:

Davy Rothbart imagines lives from the scraps people toss out.

Special To The Jewish Week
09/03/2014

Collecting scrap metal, reselling old clothes, even pawn broking —Jews have been in the recycling business for a long time, turning the flotsam and jetsam of other people’s lives into gold. Davy Rothbart, founder of Found magazine, has taken the most unlikely detritus — from love letters to snapshots to shopping lists — and made it into a kind of art. Now comes “Found,” a new Off-Broadway musical based on Rothbart’s unusual quest. With a book by Hunter Bell and Lee Overtree and music by Eli Bolin, the show runs this fall at the Atlantic Theater Company with Nick Blaemire starring as Rothbart.

Politics And (What Else?) Sex:

Mario Correa’s ‘Tail! Spin!’

Special To The Jewish Week
09/03/2014

Sex scandals may be implicitly ridiculous, but Anthony Weiner’s fall from grace had more than a touch of the absurd. Perfect fodder, in other words, for comedy. In the new satirical play, “Tail! Spin!” by political commentator Mario Correa, Weiner and three other politicians (Mark Sanford, Larry Craig and Mark Foley) felled by sexual improprieties (or the perception thereof) are back in the spotlight. Drawn entirely from the e-mails, texts and tweets of the disgraced politicians themselves, the play will be produced for 10 weeks Off Broadway featuring “Saturday Night Live” comedian Rachel Dratch.

SNL’s Rachel Dratch plays the female roles in “Tail! Spin!”, a play about politicians’ sexual controversies.

Fall Arts Preview September 2014

The New Season In Theater, Music, Film, Visual Arts And Books.

09/02/2014
Fall Arts Preview September 2014

The Lists

02/19/2014

THE THEATER LIST

Jonathan Hadary stars in Paddy Chayefsky’s classic 1956 drama, “The Middle of the Night,” about a middle-aged dress manufacturer who falls in love with a younger woman. The off-Broadway production opens Feb. 27 at the Harold Clurman Theatre, 410 W. 42nd St. For tickets, $61.25, call Telecharge at (212) 239-6200.

Books:

02/19/2014

Fiction

In her award-winning debut novel, “All Russians Love Birch Trees” (Other Press, February), Olga Grjasnowa tells of the uncommon adventures of a young, multilingual Jewish immigrant from Azerbaijan who is forced to deal with grief. It is set in Frankfurt and then in Israel. Translated from the German by Eva Bacon.

New offerings from acclaimed Israeli novelist David Grossman, food writer Laura Silver and novelist Ayelet Waldman.

Visual Arts: ‘Degenerate Art’:

Neue Galerie show first in 20 years to deal with modern works the Nazi’s condemned.

Special To The Jewish Week
02/19/2014

The most anticipated show of the spring season is “Degenerate Art: The Attack on Modern Art in Nazi Germany 1937” at the Neue Galerie, the elegant Upper East Side museum dedicated to German and Austrian art. Perhaps the excitement is due, at least in part, to the suddenly widespread attention focused on Nazi policy regarding art. Hollywood is banking millions with its star-studded film “The Monuments Men,” about a U.S. army unit that recovered art stolen by the Nazis during World War II. The so-called “Gurlitt Trove,” the recent discovery of over 1,400 works of art in the Munich apartment of Cornelius Gurlitt, the son of a wartime dealer, caused an international stir.

Max Beckmann’s “Departure,” 1932, is part of “Degenerate Art” show. Courtesy of 2014 MoMA/SCALA

The Music List

02/19/2014

March 3: Max Raabe and the Palast Orchester visit New York City with their own brand of edgy nostalgia, a deft invocation of the spirit of the Weimar Republic that ranges from the music of Sholom Secunda to Walt Disney. Carnegie Hall (57th Street and Seventh Avenue)

Music: Hearing A Jewish Downbeat:

Ben Goldberg at The Stone.

Special To The Jewish Week
02/19/2014

It’s been is a long time — almost five years — since clarinetist Ben Goldberg made a record with the New Klezmer Trio. But the experience of taking the klezmer framework as a starting point for free jazz improvisation still rings true for Goldberg, whose most recent recordings probably owe more to early Ornette Coleman or Jimmy Giuffre in their song-like compositions and artfully intricate structures. He says it’s like a downbeat that runs through his whole career.

Clarinetist Ben Goldberg: Curating a week of performances. Courtesy of Kasis

Film Television: Viennese Pastries

The sweet and the bittersweet.

Special To The Jewish Week
02/19/2014

Say “Vienna” and you think of café culture, fueled by Jewish wits like Karl Kraus, Peter Altenberg, Egon Friedell. Decadent, hothouse-rose painters like Schiele and Klimt. Strauss waltzes. Deft, mordant writers like Schnitzler and Stefan Zweig. Freud. Wittgenstein. Schoenberg.

Billy Wilder’s 1948 “The Emperor Waltz.” Courtesy of Austrian Film Museum
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