The Good Life

Book Of LOVE

Special To The Jewish Week
12/08/2009
As often happens, Shirley Friedenthal recently met a beautiful older woman who lives alone. And as also often happens, Friedenthal soon learned the details of the woman’s love life. The woman confided that she’s 77, still working, and still very interested in men. Alas, she didn’t know how to find one.

The Shortest Commute

Assistant Managing Editor
12/08/2009
When Stuart Reichman, a chef from Teaneck, N.J., was forced out of his job at a large kosher processing plant due to downsizing last year, he put what he had learned there to good use. “I had never worked in a factory before,” said Reichman, 44. “It was a very different kind of work, and I learned about production, quality control and the creativity of making a new product. I also came across ingredients that in all my years of cooking I had never come across.”

Scaling The Language Barrier

Special To The Jewish Week
12/08/2009
Driven by Zionism, native New Yorkers-cum-Chicagoans Gershom and Bobbie Lichtenberg immigrated to Israel two years ago, leaving behind their adult children and their ability to speak the local language. Both joined ulpan programs at level Aleph — the lowest, for beginners — and, compounding their challenge, chose specifically to live in a mostly Russian neighborhood so that they’d have no choice but to learn conversational Hebrew.

Rebuilding Community In The West

JTA
12/08/2009
Scottsdale, Ariz. — Jean and Arnold Palestine are glad to be back home — an attached condo unit overlooking the craggy red mountains of the Arizona desert. Having just returned from a winter visit to Florida, the octogenarian New Yorkers are pleased that they chose to retire to the arid Western desert in 1992 rather than move down south.

Portrait Of The Artist As An Older Man

Jewish Week Book Critic
12/08/2009
I would love William D. Kaufman’s stories even if he weren’t 95 and this wasn’t his first book.

Avoiding Retirement Pitfalls

Assistant Managing Editor
12/08/2009
The day you leave the office with your gold watch is a poor time to start thinking about how to make investments. But in today’s wait-and-see economy, more middle-aged workers are putting off the tough decisions, says Spencer Sherman, author of “The Cure For Money Madness (Random House). And what they think is conservative may prove risky. Here’s his take on what you can do today with limited resources to plan for what will, hopefully, be abundant golden years. What’s your advice to those with retirement in sight, if not around the corner?

Overcoming Fear Of Mice

07/23/2008
Staff Writer
Bent over a doubly magnified computer screen, 82-year-old Arnold clenched his mouse and clicked “OK” after typing his phone number into the AutoCorrect feature of his Microsoft Word document. He returned to the blank white screen and entered a prescribed command in Times New Roman, size 18 font, and defiantly pressed “Enter.” “Magic!” Arnold exclaimed, his mouth agape and jaw dropping rapidly, as he watched the digits of his phone number instantly fly onto the screen.

Portrait Of The Artist As An Older Man

Jewish Week Book Critic
12/09/2009

I would love William D. Kaufman’s stories even if he weren’t 95 and this wasn’t his first book.

older.gif

Avoiding Retirement Pitfalls

Assistant Managing Editor
12/09/2009

The day you leave the office with your gold watch is a poor time to start thinking about how to make investments. But in today’s wait-and-see economy, more middle-aged workers are putting off the tough decisions, says Spencer Sherman, author of “The Cure For Money Madness (Random House). And what they think is conservative may prove risky. Here’s his take on what you can do today with limited resources to plan for what will, hopefully, be abundant golden years.

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