Charitable Giving

Hands-on Tzedakah Education

In the classroom and extra-curricular activities, local Jewish schools are teaching today’s students to be tomorrow’s givers.

Staff Writer
11/08/2011

In the Yeshivah of Flatbush’s Sephardic Beit Midrash, faculty member Sara Ovadia is leading a few dozen students in a lunch-hour discussion about charity late one recent morning.

While the students, members of the school’s Tzedakah Commission, an educational-activist project, quietly pick at pizza and pasta in the crowded study hall, Ovadia outlines several upcoming programs for which she will need volunteers. A food pantry. A scavenger hunt. Pledges for teachers racing in a fund-raising marathon.

Sara Ovadia, faculty adviser to Yeshivah of Flatbush’s Tzedakah Commission.

Charitable Giving November 2011

From a yeshiva in Brooklyn to the orchards of Rehovot, learning the lessons of tzedakah. Plus, American ‘Friends Of’ groups adjusting to new giving realities, and one family’s giving circle.

11/08/2011
Charitable Giving November 2011

A Leadership Training Program Struggles For Funding

In tough economic times, what’s seen as a particularly valuable
federation initiative needs a donor or two.

Special To The Jewish Week
10/12/2010

Melissa Donald, a staff member at the Jewish Community Center in Manhattan since 2003, decided only a few years ago that her work in the Jewish world was not just a job, nor even a career, but “a calling.”

But that discovery wouldn’t have come at that point in her life if it weren’t for the Muehlstein Institute, she said, referring to the training program sponsored by UJA-Federation of New York for Jewish communal professionals at the start of their career.

Melissa Donald.

Charity Begins At The Beginning

Instilling the spirit of tzedakah at a young age,
and keeping it going.

Special To The Jewish Week
10/12/2010

F rom the time Sue Blumberg’s 12-year-old son Sam was 2, she’s made sure to include him in meaningful volunteer activities.

Westchester teens work on a variety of projects in a Yonkers warehouse. courtesy of the AFYA Foundation.

For The Perplexed, A Guide To Giving

Experts weigh in on how to judge requests and
vet charities. The philanthropic road from
Maimonides to Guidestar.

Staff Writer
10/12/2010

A middle-aged professional in the Jewish communal world, Ari H. deals with a dilemma of Jewish life every time he returns from his Manhattan office to his home in Bergen County — how to honor the mitzvah of giving tzedakah with integrity while sorting out the constant requests for his money.

A Foundation With A Cause

One family foundation has made the inclusion of special needs children in the Jewish community its signature issue.

Staff Writer
10/12/2010

L ike most family foundations, the Ruderman Family Foundation at first operated as a checkbook, giving away money to a variety of different causes. Then, about six years ago, the foundation partnered with Gateways: Access to Jewish Education and Boston’s Combined Jewish Philanthropies to launch the Initiative for Day School Excellence, a $45 million effort that enabled Jewish children with special needs to access any of the 14 Jewish day schools in the Boston area.

Jay Ruderman: “The Jewish community cannot ignore children with special needs.”

When Facebook And Philanthropy Meet

Chabad schools poised to win big money
from Kohl’s national schools giveaway.

Special To The Jewish Week
10/12/2010

H ebrew Academy in Huntington Beach, Calif., might only have 300-odd students, but when it comes to community outreach, it seems to have no trouble harnessing the power of social networking to press its cause.

Rabbi Yitzchak Newman

Using Philanthropy ‘To Solve Problems’

Mark Charendoff, the departing Jewish Funders Network president, looks back, and ahead.

Staff Writer
10/12/2010

When Mark Charendoff publicly announced his decision to step down as president of the Jewish Funders Network at the end of the year, he was following his own advice. In an Opinion piece in The Jewish Week last month, Charendoff called for term limits for heads of Jewish communal agencies. “How long is too long at the top?” he asked. “I’m not dogmatic, but eight to 10 years feels like it’s enough. While it may seem a short time, it should.

 Charendoff.

Charitable Giving October 2010

Outgoing Jewish Funders Network president on present, and future, of Jewish philanthropy; family foundation makes special needs a signature issue; Chabad schools poised to reap Kohl's contest money.

10/12/2010
Charitable Giving

Keeping Pace With Nature's Fury

As a succession of disasters strike, Jewish relief organizations struggle to raise enough funds to respond.

09/12/2008
Editorial Intern

Almost four years after the 2004 tsunami in South Asia, one of the deadliest natural disasters in history, relief and rebuilding efforts in the affected areas are far from over.
But in the years since, disasters and crises in other areas of the world have also demanded attention and humanitarian aid, including the cyclone in Burma and the earthquake in Sichuan, China, both of which hit in May of this year, and more recently the war in South Ossetia, Georgia. Add to that the damage on U.S. soil from a succession of tropical storms and hurricanes.

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