Charitable Giving

Food Philanthropy Aiding An Empty Jerusalem

Culinary initiatives helping ailing restaurants and those on the front lines.

Contributing Editor

Jerusalem — Since the start of the latest wave of terror attacks, many of them stabbings carried out by young Palestinians, most Jerusalem residents have opted to stay close to home out of fear for their safety. Once-bustling shops and restaurants are now struggling for business.

The Eatifada effort has helped bring Israelis out to struggling restaurants. Sid Slivko

‘Laughs By Themselves Are Not Enough’

Jerry Lewis, legendary Jewish comic and humanitarian, stays relevant at 89.


Through appreciation of both his comedy and humanitarian work, legendary Jewish entertainer Jerry Lewis is staying relevant at age 89.

Jerry Lewis in the 1950 comedy “At War with the Army.”

‘Israel Has No Better Friends Around The World’

Conference highlights impact rising evangelical support could have on the Jewish state — politically and economically.


B  lack lights and sensational music. Dancing. Prayer. Charity. A march of thousands of colors from more than 80 nations — a march in solidarity with Israel. In essence, it’s Jerusalem’s Christian Zionist Super Bowl.

The scene at the Feast of Tabernacles celebration last month in Jerusalem. Courtesy of ICEJ

The ABCs Of Donor-Advised Funds

An interview with FJC’s CEO Leonard Glickman.

Staff Writer

Leonard Glickman is the chief executive officer of FJC – A Foundation of Philanthropic Funds, which manages more than $255 million in assets. It administers more than 1,000 donor-advised funds and has distributed more than $370 million to charities in 25 countries.

Leonard Glickman: His foundation advises donors who are charitable but “have no experience in running a charity.”

‘They Gave Me A Chance In Life’

A successful Wall Streeter remembers Brooklyn College — in a big way.

Staff Writer

It was, to say the least, an uphill climb for Murray Koppelman.

Born in Borough Park in 1931 to immigrant parents who lived on welfare for seven years during the Great Depression, Koppelman said he graduated high school with “lousy grades” and then spent the next year-and-a-half working on a kibbutz. No sooner did he return home in 1953 than he was drafted for a two-year stint in the Army.

Brooklyn College was the path to success for Murray Koppelman, son of poor immigrant parents. Wikimedia Commons

The Sole Of Giving

A Rhode Island teen gives back, one pair of shoes at a time.

Web Editor

When Nicholas Lowinger was a young boy growing up in Cranston, R.I., he would tag along with his mother, an art therapist, as she gave lessons in local homeless shelters. Even as a 5-year-old, Lowinger was moved by the shelter residents, many of whom were young children who wore tattered footwear — if any at all.

Nicholas Lowinger launched the Gotta Have Sole Foundation five years ago. Courtesy of Nicholas Lowinger

When Giving Is A Legacy

With a huge generational transfer of wealth underway, philanthropists follow, and veer from, their parents’ decisions.

Staff Writer

After her father’s death in 2010, Natalie Schleifer of Manhattan found herself in charge of the family foundation established nine years earlier by her father, who had a successful career in real estate investment and development.

Natalie Schleifer, right, with her father Jack and her children Deenie and Billy at their b’nai mitzvot.Natalie Schleifer

Charitable Giving November 2015

Generations of giving. Repaying Brooklyn College. Eatifada campaign for J’salem

Charitable Giving November 2015

Crafting A Sense Of Compassion

Florida-based arts-and-crafts program teaches bar/bat mitzvah candidates about homelessness and philanthropy.

Staff Writer

Last fall, Isabella Malaga of Boca Raton, Fla., was introduced by her aunt to the children of families in a homeless day center in nearby Delray Beach. When it came time to choose a bat mitzvah project earlier this year, Isabella already knew what she wanted to do.

Isabella Malaga holds her cardboard tzedakah “house.” With her is Family Promise’s Kokie Dinnan. Courtesy of the Malaga family

Teaching Women What They’re Worth

Hadassah and Jewish Women International team up to educate boomers about financial literacy, with philanthropy as the end goal.

Staff Writer

For the past 10 years, financial literacy programs for teenage girls and young women have been sprouting up around the country Colleges, including Barnard, New York University and Harvard, have designed courses geared specifically to helping female students manage their finances.

A Jewish Women’s International “Know your Worth” session earlier this year. Courtesy of JWI
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