Celebrate

Glatt With A View

For a surprising number of catering halls on the Island, being on the water means having kosher options, too.
Staff Writer
11/29/2010 - 19:00

Awedding ceremony on an oversized patio filled with lush gardens and a waterfall, all overlooking the water. Sound appealing? Can you have all that and a kosher menu, too.

At a time when many non-Orthodox weddings are held at non-kosher venues, a survey of several catering halls on Long Island found that a surprising number of them are amenable to permitting outside kosher caterers to come in, kasher (make kosher) their kitchen and prepare all of the food.

The Thatched Cottage’s Rose Room overlooks Centerport Harbor. Courtesy of Thatched Cottage

For Simcha Food, Less Is Suddenly More

Small entrée plates, mini desserts are new trends; dairy weddings on the rise, too.
Editorial Assistant
11/29/2010 - 19:00

When it comes to the food at kosher weddings, bar mitzvahs and catered events these days, small is, well, big. Small portions, that is.

“The biggest trend we’re seeing is small plates,” said Ellen Vaknine, vice president of sales at Esprit Events, a glatt-kosher caterer based in Manhattan. “Three small, entrée-type food items on a plate as the main dish,” so that guests can enjoy several different dishes at one time, Vaknine adds.

Guests at Justine Fisher and Rob Alloway’s wedding enjoyed a dairy dinner, which enabled them to have rich, decadent desserts.

Crown Heights’ Upper Crust

At a kosher pizza and wine bar, black meets Jew and frum meets foodie.
Special To The Jewish Week
11/29/2010 - 19:00

W hen the New York Times Magazine ran a prominent story in October about Basil Pizza and Wine Bar, a new kosher restaurant in Crown Heights, the writer, Frank Bruni, told of the place’s ambiance and its efforts to bring together Jews and their non-Jewish neighbors. But, as a letter writer bluntly pointed out the following week in the magazine, Bruni, formerly the paper’s restaurant critic, didn’t say much about the food. Good intentions and all, it was the pizza that the letter writer really wanted to hear about.

The scene at Basil. Michael Datikash

Celebrate December 2010

Crown Heights' upper crust, less is now more in wedding food, glatt with a view on Long Island, Israeli caterers go "healthy," and more.
Staff Writer
11/29/2010 - 19:00
Celebrate December 2010

Bridal Jewelry Going Less Traditional

Special To The Jewish Week
05/25/2010 - 20:00

Jerusalem — On their wedding 

             day, brides wear the most beautiful

     jewelry they can buy or borrow. To the groom, his finance’s deliberations over which necklace or headpiece to wear can feel like an obsession.  

While many Israeli women, especially if they are very religious, continue to choose traditional strands of pearls or a diamond pendant with matching earrings for their wedding day, an increasing number of Israeli brides are going the less-traditional route. 

This Negrin necklace is made of clusters of crystals. Inset: A lyrical necklace from the Hedya Design Studio.

No Texting During The Haftorah!

Welcome to etiquette boot camp for the bar/bat mitzvah set.
Special to the Jewish Week
05/25/2010 - 20:00

Send in your RSVP on time. Don’t show up at the bar mitzvah party in sneakers. And no text messaging during the bar mitzvah boy’s speech.

Has Miss Manners gone Jewish? Maybe not but a growing number of yeshiva day schools are arming their students with such etiquette tips before they take their spin on the bar/bat mitzvah circuit.

The Gifted Child

Special To The Jewish Week
05/25/2010 - 20:00

 When my niece Simone turned 4, I instinctively knew what she would treasure: a set of miniature-sized nail polish in brilliant hues of red and pink. She smiled at those tiny bottles all evening; even with the lids closed, lined up like dolls on our coffee table, they delivered endless amusement. 

The Book on Gifts: "The Book Thief"

Adding Meat To The Kosher Indian Plate

Special To The Jewish Week
05/25/2010 - 20:00

 At certain times of the day, the stretch of Lexington Avenue from 26th to 30th streets is fragrant with the aroma of cardamom, cloves, cumin, ginger and the other spices that fire up Indian cuisine. Taxis park all along the side streets, as their drivers take their breaks in the Indian restaurants, fast-food places, sari and spice shops that dominate the neighborhood known alternatively as Curry Hill and Little India. Diners include couples, colleagues and families, with men in turbans as well as kippot, as several of the restaurants are under rabbinic supervision.

The soon-to-open Shalom Bombay on Lexington Avenue just north of Curry Hill. courtesy of shalom bombay

Celebrate May 2010

Hot Indian food, the quest for the perfect bar mitzvah gift, simcha etiquette boot camp, edgy bridal jewelry and more
05/25/2010 - 20:00

Hot Indian food, the quest for the perfect bar mitzvah gift, simcha etiquette boot camp, edgy bridal jewelry and more

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Allowing Kids To Make The Decisions

03/11/2008 - 20:00
Special To The Jewish Week

It’s not surprising that a committee at UJA-Federation of New York is now in the process of reviewing grant proposals, looking at agency budgets and visiting those same agencies. It’s the sort of work that typifies the allocation of money by any large charity, be it federation or another organization.

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