Celebrate

Let Them Eat … Lions And Gorillas

College student (and ‘Cake Boss’ intern) Melissa Alt is honing her craft of high-end cake decorating for simchas.

Special To The Jewish Week
11/18/2014 - 19:00

Melissa Alt has both a lion head and a gorilla head on display in her family’s dining room. No, she’s not an avid hunter, but a budding cake decorator displaying the remnants of her most prized works of art.

Sweet vocation: Teaneck’s Melissa Alt delights in crafting cakes in creative shapes, including members of the animal kingdom.

The Eighth Day, For Girls

New book offers a cultural and religious history of the ritual behind baby naming.

Culture Editor
11/18/2014 - 19:00

Sharon Siegel rethinks the first lifecycle event for newborn girls, presenting a ceremony — and the research and halachic thought behind it — for the eighth day of life.

Lawyer-author Sharon Siegel has written a guide for welcoming girls that avoids denominational distinctions. Sharon Siege

A Simcha That’s Cinematic

Jerusalem’s Cinema City complex mixes the modern and the traditional.

Israel Correspondent
11/18/2014 - 19:00

Jerusalem — Only in Jerusalem could a single events venue offer an educational celebration in a Bible museum and a bash in the VIP lounge and movie theater. 

Celebrate November 2014

A Simcha That’s Cinematic; The Eighth Day, For Girls; Let Them Eat … Lions And Gorillas

11/17/2014 - 19:00
Celebrate November 2014

Celebrate December 2013

Destination Weddings, With A Jewish Twist, Flowing Cups Freshly Remember’d, Israeli Artists Heighten Simcha’s Meaning, ‘If You Can Move, You Can Dance’

12/10/2013 - 19:00
Celebrate December 2013

‘If You Can Move, You Can Dance’

Teaneck dance instructor (the former Miss Motion) often leads, but sometimes follows.

Culture Editor
12/10/2013 - 19:00

Weeknights in Teaneck, a high school gym is transformed into a make-believe ballroom, as couples circle around the floor, waltzing or doing the tango or a fox trot to Frank Sinatra’s “Fly Me To The Moon.” The instructor, a magical dancer named Lauren Faustini, gently guides them, adjusting their stance, and sometimes preventing them from colliding.

Lauren Faustini with her husband, Gus Faustini.

Thank you to our advertisers for supporting our Celebrate issue. Please look at this additional information in their own words. Look out for our next Celebrate issue on June 13, 2014

12/10/2013 - 19:00

The Center for Kosher Culinary Arts (CKCA) of Brooklyn, New York
Is the worldwide destination for those seeking culinary education in an uncompromised kosher environment. Over 400 professional training students have traveled to study at CKCA from within the US and from as far away as Australia, Panama, Mexico, the UK, Italy, and Canada since it is the only Kosher Culinary School outside of Israel. CKCA has been featured FOX5-TV, The New York Times and many other publications.

Israeli Artists Heighten Simcha’s Meaning

More affordable options now available for bar/bat mitzvah gifts with religious significance.

Israel Correspondent
12/10/2013 - 19:00

Jerusalem — As bar- and bat-mitzvah celebrations have become more sophisticated and often more costly over the years, so too have many of the gifts. While many 12- and 13-year-olds continue to welcome pocketknives or a piece of jewelry, it’s not unusual for the celebrant to request an iPod or contributions toward a tablet or new computer. 

Dvora Black creates bar- and bat-mitzvah portraits with photograph and a dedication in Hebrew.

Flowing Cups Freshly Remember’d

Reflections on the wine at a wine writer’s wedding.

Special To The Jewish Week
12/10/2013 - 19:00

In the eight years that I’ve written The Jewish Week’s Fruit of the Vine column, I have, as a rule, not brought my personal life into the column; not because I am against that style of writing, but because I don’t think that my rather dull, mid-management life would be of much interest to Jewish Week readers. However, for this column I have decided to make an exception.

Three of the wines suitable for a wine writer’s wedding ceremony/reception.

If You’re Thinking Of Tying The Knot Abroad

Special To The Jewish Week
12/10/2013 - 19:00

♦ Plan to marry in a civil ceremony in the U.S., preferably before departing for the religious ceremony. After a destination wedding, you may be married in the eyes of God, but not according to city hall. Most foreign countries have red tape that makes legal marriage for foreigners difficult or outright impossible. This ranges from lengthy waiting periods — for witnesses as well as bride and groom — to blood tests and  citizenship requirements. In many countries, the legal officiate must be a representative of the local government — or even of the state church!

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