Healthcare

Man Of Science, Man Of Faith

Staff Writer
10/20/2009
When it comes to curing cancer, one scientist gives God all the credit as he moves one step closer to slaying the resilient killer.

D.C. Support For AFMDA

10/20/2009
An American Friends of Magen David Adom ambulance was dedicated to members of the U.S. Congress last month in a ceremony on Capitol Hill. The purchase of the ambulance, which will be put to use in Israel, was made possible by a gift from the estate of Jack Greenberg of Cincinnati. Some 20 House and Senate members attended the event, including Rep. Nita Lowey (D-Westchester) and Jerrold Nadler (D-Manhattan). The emergency vehicle was dedicated on the eve of AFMDA’s 70th anniversary.

An Innocent Patient Abroad

Special To The Jewish Week
10/20/2009
Perhaps it was divine retribution for the blatantly treif lunch I’d enjoyed so much at one of Zichron Yaakov’s new boutique eateries earlier that day.

‘To Do Chesed, Every Day’

Special To The Jewish Week
10/20/2009
‘Jews don’t become nurses,” Meryl Collyns (then Greenblum) was told, when she expressed interest in nursing school as she was completing high school in Queens in the early 1970s. But she persisted and upon graduation got a job at Roosevelt Hospital, where she has worked for more than 30 years and now serves as director of nursing for maternal child health. When she began, she was one of three Jewish nurses in the hospital and recalls that her manager, a Seventh Day Adventist, was sympathetic to her scheduling needs around the Sabbath and holidays.

The Ashkenazi-Adiponectic Connection

10/29/2008
Staff Writer
As a month-long string of food-consuming holidays comes to an end, Jews across the world will unbutton their waistbands and perhaps hop on a treadmill to avoid the looming threat of obesity that afflicts so many Jewish families. But those with a genetic predisposition to obesity may now have another related monster to fear — colorectal cancer.

Navigating The Shoals Of Breast Cancer

10/29/2008
Staff Writer
In the early 1990s, two oncologists — troubled by how frustrated and confused their newly-diagnosed breast cancer patients felt — decided to comprehensively address their lists of unanswered questions. The doctors teamed up to publish the first edition of a guidebook to breast cancer in 1992.

Gut Check

05/14/2008
Editorial Intern
When Marcy Strickler was 10 years old, she suddenly faced frequent bouts of diarrhea and completely lost her appetite and energy — far from the ideal situation for an active fifth grader. For a while, she tried to ignore the symptoms and hid everything from her parents. But as hard as she tried, she couldn’t hide the illness forever. “I just woke up one morning and I physically couldn’t go to school,” she said.

After The Screening

05/14/2008
Editorial Intern
After learning about the benefits of genetic screening from her physician, a pregnant woman decides to schedule an amniocentesis test. Doctors carefully screen her amniotic fluid sample, and they determine that her fetus has an extra 21st chromosome — in other words, the child will be born with Down syndrome. The patient instantly faces an emotional quandary: should she go forward with the pregnancy, or should she have an abortion? This kind of thorny ethical question was at the center of a forum on genetic disease forum held May 5 at the JCC in Manhattan.

After The Screening

05/14/2008
Editorial Intern
After learning about the benefits of genetic screening from her physician, a pregnant woman decides to schedule an amniocentesis test. Doctors carefully screen her amniotic fluid sample, and they determine that her fetus has an extra 21st chromosome — in other words, the child will be born with Down syndrome. The patient instantly faces an emotional quandary: should she go forward with the pregnancy, or should she have an abortion?    

Painless Gift Of Life

06/22/2007
Staff Writer
One of the guests of honor at the recent commencement exercises of Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion, sitting at the far left of the first row of the sanctuary in Temple Emanu-El, was neither guest speaker, college official Nor financial supporter of the institution. Dalia Samansky, a third-year rabbinical student at the school’s Los Angeles campus who received her master’s degree in L.A. the following week, was invited to the New York commencement as role model. She had saved a life.
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