Healthcare

The Book On Coping

05/15/2009
Staff Writer
Physical maladies, psychological illness, financial difficulties — these are pervasive in contemporary society and seem to be becoming more prevalent. And so are books meant to help people navigate through these choppy emotional waters. Judaism has answers for these problems: not a single, monolithic answer, but responses as varied as the Jewish people themselves. Here are some current answers:

Breaking The Taboo

04/24/2002
Staff Writer
On a cold April night two years ago, Alan Dutka stood on the roof of his Teaneck, N.J., apartment building and jumped. The suicide of this bright, devout former Yeshiva University student who for eight years had suffered from schizophrenia belied the belief that religious Jews don't suffer from psychiatric illness, that it is a scourge of "the outside world."

On DNA Testing, A Murky Vision

05/14/2008
Staff Writer
I’ve been meaning to have my DNA tested in hope of locating the genetic mutation that impairs my vision. The mutation makes me legally blind, leaving me unable to drive and using one of those white canes in crowds and at night.

DNA Analysis, Direct To You

05/14/2008
Staff Writer
It had big-money marketing written all over it. Every detail in the Soho gallery space was futuristically sleek and designed to impress the New Yorkers who, the company hoped, would be sold on shelling out $2,499 to get their DNA tested for 18 disease predispositions — but only after they enjoyed fresh pomegranate juice or a “Navitini,” a cocktail created for the occasion. Munching on healthy hors d’hoevres, several dozen people milled among the computer monitors showing Navigenics videos of happy customers.

Making The Cut

05/15/2009
Staff Writer
A recent Facebook message from a total stranger, one of dozens and dozens Jessica Queller has received since she went public this year with an agonizingly personal medical decision, shared a familiar story. The stranger, a woman in her mid-30s, was a cancer survivor, unmarried, with no immediate matrimonial prospects. She wanted to have children. Queller understood.

The Age Of Meaning

10/20/2009
Staff Writer
Rabbi Dayle Friedman, author and director of the Reconstructionist Rabbinical College’s Hiddur: The Center for Aging and Judaism, has served as a pioneer in the Jewish community’s work with the elderly. She was founding director of chaplaincy services at the Philadelphia Geriatric Center, and a founding member of the National Association of Jewish Chaplains and the Forum on Aging, Religion and Spirituality.

Making The Cut

05/13/2009
Staff Writer
A recent Facebook message from a total stranger, one of dozens and dozens Jessica Queller has received since she went public this year with an agonizingly personal medical decision, shared a familiar story. The stranger, a woman in her mid-30s, was a cancer survivor, unmarried, with no immediate matrimonial prospects. She wanted to have children. Queller understood.

The Book On Coping

05/13/2009
Staff Writer
Physical maladies, psychological illness, financial difficulties — these are pervasive in contemporary society and seem to be becoming more prevalent. And so are books meant to help people navigate through these choppy emotional waters. Judaism has answers for these problems: not a single, monolithic answer, but responses as varied as the Jewish people themselves. Here are some current answers: The Sun Will Shine Again: Coping, Persevering, and Winning in Troubled Economic  Times. Rabbi Abraham Twerski. (Shaar Press, $9.99)

A Refuge For Hurting Families

10/29/2008
Staff Writer
Houston — Tzipora Mintz’s first concern when her husband learned he had to come here for medical treatment in early 2003 was his health. He had lymphoma, an advanced form of the cancer of the immune system.   Her second concern was housing. She and her husband — a young Orthodox couple from Brooklyn, they had recently had a new child — would be spending months, on and off, in Houston, while he received care at the Texas Medical Center.

Pink Ribbons In Once-Red Europe

10/29/2008
Staff Writer
In Russia, a three-day gathering of physicians and breast cancer survivors. In Hungary, a nationwide breast cancer screening program. In Bosnia-Herzegovina, a breast cancer hot line.   Four years after the American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee joined the Susan G. Komen Breast Cancer Foundation in a series of pilot advocacy and educational programs in three former Iron Curtain countries, tens of thousands of women are learning to take their health, literally, into their own hands, leaders of the initiative say.
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