Healthcare

Navigating The Shoals Of Breast Cancer

10/29/2008
Staff Writer
In the early 1990s, two oncologists — troubled by how frustrated and confused their newly-diagnosed breast cancer patients felt — decided to comprehensively address their lists of unanswered questions. The doctors teamed up to publish the first edition of a guidebook to breast cancer in 1992.

Gut Check

05/14/2008
Editorial Intern
When Marcy Strickler was 10 years old, she suddenly faced frequent bouts of diarrhea and completely lost her appetite and energy — far from the ideal situation for an active fifth grader. For a while, she tried to ignore the symptoms and hid everything from her parents. But as hard as she tried, she couldn’t hide the illness forever. “I just woke up one morning and I physically couldn’t go to school,” she said.

After The Screening

05/14/2008
Editorial Intern
After learning about the benefits of genetic screening from her physician, a pregnant woman decides to schedule an amniocentesis test. Doctors carefully screen her amniotic fluid sample, and they determine that her fetus has an extra 21st chromosome — in other words, the child will be born with Down syndrome. The patient instantly faces an emotional quandary: should she go forward with the pregnancy, or should she have an abortion? This kind of thorny ethical question was at the center of a forum on genetic disease forum held May 5 at the JCC in Manhattan.

After The Screening

05/14/2008
Editorial Intern
After learning about the benefits of genetic screening from her physician, a pregnant woman decides to schedule an amniocentesis test. Doctors carefully screen her amniotic fluid sample, and they determine that her fetus has an extra 21st chromosome — in other words, the child will be born with Down syndrome. The patient instantly faces an emotional quandary: should she go forward with the pregnancy, or should she have an abortion?    

Painless Gift Of Life

06/22/2007
Staff Writer
One of the guests of honor at the recent commencement exercises of Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion, sitting at the far left of the first row of the sanctuary in Temple Emanu-El, was neither guest speaker, college official Nor financial supporter of the institution. Dalia Samansky, a third-year rabbinical student at the school’s Los Angeles campus who received her master’s degree in L.A. the following week, was invited to the New York commencement as role model. She had saved a life.

Pink Ribbons In Once-Red Europe

10/30/2009
Staff Writer
In Russia, a three-day gathering of physicians and breast cancer survivors. In Hungary, a nationwide breast cancer screening program. In Bosnia-Herzegovina, a breast cancer hot line.  Four years after the American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee joined the Susan G. Komen Breast Cancer Foundation in a series of pilot advocacy and educational programs in three former Iron Curtain countries, tens of thousands of women are learning to take their health, literally, into their own hands, leaders of the initiative say.

A Refuge For Hurting Families

10/31/2008
Staff Writer
Houston — Tzipora Mintz’s first concern when her husband learned he had to come here for medical treatment in early 2003 was his health. He had lymphoma, an advanced form of the cancer of the immune system.   Her second concern was housing. She and her husband — a young Orthodox couple from Brooklyn, they had recently had a new child — would be spending months, on and off, in Houston, while he received care at the Texas Medical Center.

The Book On Coping

05/15/2009
Staff Writer
Physical maladies, psychological illness, financial difficulties — these are pervasive in contemporary society and seem to be becoming more prevalent. And so are books meant to help people navigate through these choppy emotional waters. Judaism has answers for these problems: not a single, monolithic answer, but responses as varied as the Jewish people themselves. Here are some current answers:

Breaking The Taboo

04/24/2002
Staff Writer
On a cold April night two years ago, Alan Dutka stood on the roof of his Teaneck, N.J., apartment building and jumped. The suicide of this bright, devout former Yeshiva University student who for eight years had suffered from schizophrenia belied the belief that religious Jews don't suffer from psychiatric illness, that it is a scourge of "the outside world."

On DNA Testing, A Murky Vision

05/14/2008
Staff Writer
I’ve been meaning to have my DNA tested in hope of locating the genetic mutation that impairs my vision. The mutation makes me legally blind, leaving me unable to drive and using one of those white canes in crowds and at night.
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