Healthcare

Kosher Food Going Natural

New Emphasis on low-fat, low-carb, organic fare sweeping through industry.

02/05/2010
Editorial Intern

Traditional Jewish food — six-inch-high, artery-clogging corned-beef sandwiches, cholesterol-high cholent with kishke and chicken soup
flavored with fatty schmaltz — isn’t quite in line with a healthy, balanced diet.
But with American’s growing obsession with healthy foods, and organic products — the organic industry grew from $1 billion in 1990 to over $23 billion today — kosher producers are offering more wholesome and beneficial products, and health food producers are gaining kosher certification.

Juices from Organic Avenue — like apple, carrot, cucumber and grapefruit — are an integral part of the raw food experience.

When Veterans Come Home

06/22/2007
Special To The Jewish Week

Much of the public thinks of a soldier’s return home as a joyous time for the veteran and his or her family, but the reality can be more complicated, said Jacob Remo, the commander of a Jewish War Veterans post near Boston and a member of JWV’s Health Initiatives Committee.

The transition from war to peace is often difficult as roles change within the family, as the soldier returns to work or looks for a new job and as civilian life begins anew, Remo said, adding that all members of the family feel the stress.

I Can Help Them Get Through This

06/22/2007
Special To The Jewish Week

Nella Shapiro’s waiting room feels more like a living room than an antiseptic medical office. European vintage posters, lush plants and colorful sofas fill the room, and the breast surgeon is often up front, greeting patients by name. One day last week, a woman who had surgery about six years ago insisted on coming in with a friend who is now a patient, just to say hello to the doctor.

"You saved my life," she reminds the doctor, who then asks about the woman’s grandson.

Pound For Pound, A Tough Problem

Staff Writer
05/15/2009

Three and a half years ago, Elisheva Diamond, a clinical psychology graduate student at Long Island University and clinical research coordinator at Mount Sinai, realized that those around her in the Orthodox community couldn’t see the terror right in front of them, the disease that was eating their children alive.

Robots To Help Humans

Staff Writer
05/15/2009

New York businessman and philanthropist Arnold Goldstein and his wife Arlene have donated $5 million to establish the Unmanned Aerial Vehicles and Satellite Center at the Technion-Israel Institute of Technology in Haifa.

Goldstein said the center would be working with robots that could be used for warfare as well as for medical and humanitarian purposes.

Strength In Numbers

Staff Writer
05/15/2009

When Sarah tested positive for the BRCA1 breast cancer gene five years ago, her decision to have both her breasts removed was a simple one — her mother had died of the disease at the devastatingly young age of 42 and her grandmother at 49.

Making The Cut

Staff Writer
05/15/2009

A recent Facebook message from a total stranger, one of dozens and dozens Jessica Queller has received since she went public this year with an agonizingly personal medical decision, shared a familiar story.

The stranger, a woman in her mid-30s, was a cancer survivor, unmarried, with no immediate matrimonial prospects. She wanted to have children.

The Gene Scene

Special To The Jewish Week
05/15/2009

The cloud of breast cancer has loomed over Betsy Miller Landis her entire life. In her earliest memories, she’s playing on the floor of her mother’s hospital room. Two decades later, she lost her mother to a recurrence. Then again at 54, the age when her mother died, Landis’ thoughts returned to the disease, as she worried about apparent irregularities in herself.

The Book On Coping

Staff Writer
05/15/2009

Physical maladies, psychological illness, financial difficulties — these are pervasive in contemporary society and seem to be becoming more prevalent. And so are books meant to help people navigate through these choppy emotional waters. Judaism has answers for these problems: not a single, monolithic answer, but responses as varied as the Jewish people themselves.

Here are some current answers:

The Sun Will Shine Again: Coping, Persevering, and Winning in Troubled Economic Times. Rabbi Abraham Twerski. (Shaar Press, $9.99)

Moments Of Sadness Are Normal, But Don’t ‘Get Stuck’ In Them

Special To The Jewish Week
05/15/2009

Jonathan Katz, a social worker who has helped address the after-effects of the financial meltdown, says some people who’ve been hurt by the crisis fail to seek the help they need, either because they’re overwhelmed by emotion or because they’re embarrassed at having fallen.

But he likens such a response to that of the flood victim in an old, Jewish joke:

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