Education & Careers

New Developments In The Classroom And Beyond

New Jewish studies curriculum for special-needs students; family history project through PELIE; Shalem Center to become liberal arts college.

01/08/2013

Hidden Sparks Grows

Hidden Sparks recently unveiled the first part of a new Judaic studies curriculum at its sixth annual retreat, attended by 40 educators from 30 day schools in New York, New Jersey and Baltimore.

The group, which addresses the needs of diverse learners, works to help Jewish educators discover, understand and support all the students in their classrooms, including those with learning difficulties.

Aviva Stern, a teacher at Yeshiva Har Torah and a Hidden Sparks coach, said that “doing Hidden Sparks work has impacted me tremendously as a teacher to my students and in all of my relationships. Being trained to be attuned to individual’s strengths and weaknesses will continue to affect even my parenting style and how I relate to my extended family.”

Hidden Sparks aims to identify students whose potential has not yet been reached in school and in life. Founded in New York six years ago with a pilot program in seven schools, the program currently serves almost 40 schools in New York, including Ramaz in Manhattan, Bnos Pupa of Williamsburg and The Hebrew Academy of Nassau County. Through a Covenant Foundation grant, Hidden Sparks has also partnered with SHEMESH in Baltimore and REACH in Chicago, and has trained educators in Nashville, New Orleans, Tampa, Fla., and Hollywood, Fla., to bring their programs and curriculum to those cities.

A three-time recipient of the Slingshot Award, which recognizes the 50 most innovative Jewish organizations each year, Hidden Sparks is currently working with 281 teachers. Since its inception, Hidden Sparks has trained more than 1,000 teachers and has reached an estimated 10,000 students.

Debbie Niderberg, executive director of Hidden Sparks, said, “Our core curriculum and approach introduces the skills, strategies and sensitivities of special education into mainstream classes. We believe this enhanced understanding positions both teachers and students for greater success. By using a mentoring and school-based delivery model and by training ‘Internal Coaches’ in diverse learning, we believe that the program will have the greatest and most sustained impact over time on the students, teachers, and school culture.”

Hidden Sparks has also spurred additional programs, like Hidden Sparks Without Walls (HSWOW), which brings free audio and online hour-long classes to educators to enhance their knowledge of the field of diverse learning. To date, 1000 participants from 95 schools in 21 states have participated in the 45 webinars offered. In an effort to share its expertise with parents Hidden Sparks launched HSWOW Parent Connection, a free webinar series. Additionally, the group offers School Change Administrative Leadership Endeavor, or SCALE, for principals. Hidden Sparks funding comes from individuals, foundations, government and Jewish charities, including UJA-Federation of New York.

— Staff Report

Three of the winning “tikkun olam” drawings in the Grinspoon Foundation “Voices & Vision” program.

Education January 2013

Lessons In Perseverance
Area Jewish schools carry on in the wake of Sandy; bringing Hebrew school into the 21st century; an interview with Israel’s online learning pioneer, and more.

01/08/2013
Education January 2013

Today’s Complementary Ed Is Not Your Father’s Hebrew School

Special To The Jewish Week
08/22/2012

Like most recent broad-scale surveys of the Jewish population in local communities, the recently released Jewish Community Study of New York explores the impact of childhood Jewish education, including “supplemental schooling,” on adult Jewish identity.

The conclusion of the report: The old model of Jewish education in which parents dropped children off in a classroom for a few hours of instruction, in isolation from Jewish family engagement and Jewish communal life, yields little to nothing in the life of a child. Who could disagree with the findings of the study?

Cyd Weissman right, and Robert Weinberg

Finding A Jewish School For My Multiracial Child

Special To The Jewish Week
08/21/2012

We knew our daughter’s Jewish identity was going to play an important role in our lives when she named her imaginary friend “Rivka.” Isabella would point her out to me in public places as she passed, directing me to a mocha-skinned girl with curly dark hair who inevitably would look almost identical to our own sweet multiracial child.

Send In The Clowns — To The Hospital

Medical clowning program at University of Haifa is serious business.

Staff Writer
08/21/2012

Haifa — In a few years Shira Friedlander, a young Orthodox woman from Jerusalem, wants to go into Israeli hospitals to lift the spirits of patients. So these days she’s studying such subjects as anthropology, costume design and shamanism.

Clowns from Haifa’s program in Haiti.

Helping Day Schools Build For The Future

Pilot project training area schools in the fine art of endowment building.

Associate Editor
08/21/2012

When the leadership of Solomon Schechter School of Manhattan found out earlier this year about Generations, a pilot project training Jewish day schools in endowments and planned giving, it felt “perfectly timed,” said Liz Freirich, the school’s director of developmentt.

Schechter Student ‘Merits’ Attention

Rockland County ninth-grader is first recipient of new, full-freight merit scholarship at Westchester Schechter.

Associate Editor
08/21/2012

When Cara Kupferman’s parents moved to New City, in Rockland County, 20 years ago, one of the major draws was the well-regarded Clarkstown Central School District.

But next month, Cara, who thrived at her public elementary and middle schools, will forego Clarkstown South High School, instead crossing the Tappan Zee Bridge each day to attend Solomon Schechter School of Westchester.

Cara Kupferman to attend Solomon Schechter School of Westchester in Hartsdale.

Forging Their Own ‘New Connection’

Grad students in new JTS ed school program spend five months immersed in Israeli life.

Special To The Jewish Week
08/21/2012

Biking through the streets of downtown Jerusalem every day for several months, Eli Bass, 30, of Oak Park, Ill., noticed the frustrated line of bumper-to-bumper cars and buses lining the streets. In response, Bass worked at the Ma’aleh School of Film to create a five-minute documentary (available on YouTube) encouraging new, green methods of transportation in the millennia-old capitol.

Participants in Kesher Hadash grapple with complexities of Israeli culture. Courtesy JTS

New Developments In The Classroom And Beyond

New ‘blended’ school inspiring imitators; online instruction program; Israel grooming Asian leaders.

Associate Editors
08/21/2012

If Yeshivat He’Atid is really the “yeshiva of the future,” as its name proclaims, then tuition-weary parents throughout the country may want to pursue time travel.

Participants in Israel-Asia Leaders Fellowship.

Rockland Gets A New/Old Day School

The nondenominational Jewish Academy hoping to cast a wider net and build on its Gittelman connections.

Associate Editor
08/21/2012

The day school is dead. Long live the day school.

That’s the situation for non-Orthodox families in Rockland County.

In January, the 40-year-old Reuben Gittelman Hebrew Day School — which was affiliated with the Conservative movement’s Schechter Network — announced that financial problems exacerbated by declining enrollment were forcing it to close.

Rockland Jewish Academy teacher Melanie Garvey works with children as classrooms are being set up for new year. michael datikash
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