Education & Careers

Teaching The Teachers

Staff Writer
10/23/2009

When Arye Sufrin graduated from the Sy Syms School of Business at Yeshiva University, his future looked bright: the new graduate got married, spent a year in Israel, and was set to return to the United States to work at Deloitte and Touche as a certified public accountant. But things did not go as planned for Sufrin, who is now 24 years old. While in Israel, he began teaching students in a yeshiva and found the work more rewarding than he could have imagined.

Agents Of Change

Staff Writer
10/23/2009

Searching for a new, post-recession career? Consider becoming a certified residential real estate agent. That’s the pitch offered by Touro College’s Graduate School of Business. In September, Touro will launch a five-course certificate in residential real estate entrepreneurship — the first of its kind (nearby universities like NYU and Columbia only offer commercial real estate programs). “We want to upgrade the profession,” says Michael Williams, dean of Touro’s Graduate School of Business.

Resolving The Day School Crisis: It Takes A Mishpocha

Special To The Jewish Week
10/23/2009

Opinion Responding to families drowning in day school tuition bills, UJA-Federation of New York has proposed a bold plan to raise $300 million in endowments to expand scholarships. Can a massive undertaking like this actually succeed? A major day school endowment effort for New York is critical — and decades overdue. The day school tuition crisis is essentially an issue of middle-income affordability.

Familiar Programs, New Demographic

Special To The Jewish Week
10/23/2009

Although Gail Rusgo and her husband are Orthodox and attended day schools, they’ve decided not to have their children follow in their educational footsteps. Rusgo, a teacher, told her rabbi at the Lido Beach Synagogue on Long Island, “I’m going to be sending my children to public schools, and we need more children.” So she proposed offering a supplementary Hebrew school—Torah Time For Kids— as an alternative for some of the congregation’s own families, as well as non-Orthodox Jewish families in the area.

Reimagining Hebrew School

Staff Writer
10/23/2009

The story of the Garden of Eden could be seen as a biblical truth, raising eternal questions of wrong vs. right, good vs. evil. Or it could be used as a parable, a map of the human choices we face today, exploring issues of what is knowledge and what are the consequences of it in our lives? For one Manhattan congregation, the story was recently used as a little of both, as educators set up a mock court, assigning the roles of Adam, Eve, the snake and of course God to congregants, and role playing the scenario in order to learn from it.

Not Just For Olim Anymore

Staff Writer
10/23/2009

On a recent Wednesday afternoon, several English speakers circled around a pair of large wooden tables trying to learn Hebrew. They were in Ahuva Tal-Hollander’s program at West Side Institutional Synagogue, one of the largest Hebrew language programs in the city. Some were secular Jews who were dating someone religious or Israeli; others had become religious and wanted to better understand the Torah; and still others were American medical students preparing for classes in Israel this fall.

An Unplanned Lesson

Staff Writer
10/23/2009

Near the end of the 2007-08 academic year, some unusual news about one class at the Solomon Schechter School of Manhattan came home to Miriam Akabas and her daughter Ariel and other families of then-fifth-grade students: there would be no boys in the school’s sixth-grade class the following year. For various unconnected reasons, several families of end-of-year fifth-graders were moving from New York City; seven of the departing students were boys, all the males in the class.

An Unplanned Lesson

Staff Writer
10/23/2009

Near the end of the 2007-08 academic year, some unusual news about one class at the Solomon Schechter School of Manhattan came home to Miriam Akabas and her daughter Ariel and other families of then-fifth-grade students: there would be no boys in the school’s sixth-grade class the following year. For various unconnected reasons, several families of end-of-year fifth-graders were moving from New York City; seven of the departing students were boys, all the males in the class.

The KIPP-ing Point

Staff Writer
10/23/2009

On a business visit to Houston three years ago, Israeli real estate agent-turned-educator Eran Dubovi accepted a suggestion from Lee Wunsch, executive director of the city’s Jewish federation. Go see a certain public school in southwest Houston, Wunsch said.

CAJE Coming Back?

Staff Writer
10/23/2009

The Coalition for the Advancement of Jewish Education (CAJE) may be making a comeback. The education organization shuttered its doors in February and cancelled its annual conference this summer, but last week held a small, regional conference in Maryland where talked turned to what could be done to revive CAJE. The self-funded Maryland gathering was called MANAJE (Mid-Atlantic New Alternatives in Jewish Education) and brought together CAJE-ers with 30-plus years of experience as well as young new teachers.

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