Education & Careers

Striking Distance

01/09/2008
Israel Correspondent

Jerusalem — There were a few spots available this week in the gated parking lot outside the Hebrew University’s Givat Ram campus. That’s about the only good news that has so far come out of the strike by 4,500 senior faculty members of the country’s seven universities, the longest such strike in the country’s history.

Launched in October, just after the start of the new semester (and five months after university students waged a strike) the faculty strike has wreaked havoc in an already troubled higher education system.

Head Start — And More — For Ethiopian Kids

01/09/2008
Special To The Jewish Week

Rehovot, Israel — Seated in tiny chairs organized in the shape of a horseshoe, 32 kindergarteners watch attentively as their teacher, Vered Reinstein, asks them how to spell the word “Shalom” in Hebrew.  Eager hands wave as Reinstein chooses a boy to pluck the letter “shin” off a felt board, a girl to find the “vav,” until the four-letter word is completed.

An Italian Philosophy Inspires Jewish Preschools

01/09/2008
Special To The Jewish Week

On a recent winter morning the 130 children attending the nursery school at Manhattan’s Stephen Wise Free Synagogue are engaged in such hands-on projects as building a sukkah, maintaining a rooftop garden and creating small clay sculptures. Some have designed a replica of the Brooklyn Bridge, made from Styrofoam and other objects, while each class has met with a Jewish scribe to learn about a project that involves the entire congregation: the drafting of a Torah to mark the synagogue’s 100th anniversary.

 

An Italian Philosophy Inspires Jewish Preschools

01/09/2008
Special To The Jewish Week

On a recent winter morning the 130 children attending the nursery school at Manhattan’s Stephen Wise Free Synagogue are engaged in such hands-on projects as building a sukkah, maintaining a rooftop garden and creating small clay sculptures. Some have designed a replica of the Brooklyn Bridge, made from Styrofoam and other objects, while each class has met with a Jewish scribe to learn about a project that involves the entire congregation: the drafting of a Torah to mark the synagogue’s 100th anniversary.

 

Making Strides In Russia?

01/09/2008
Special To The Jewish Week

Olga Glebova identifies herself as part of a distinguished and highly regarded class in Russia, hailing, she says, from “a very old, noble Russian family.” Like much of the country, she’s also Russian Orthodox, a faith whose leaders have often been at odds with Russian Jewry.

But Glebova, an English teacher in Moscow, tries to discuss the Holocaust as much as possible at the high school in which she works.

Educators Going Viral

Israel Correspondent
01/15/2010

Jerusalem — Conference organizers usually frown on participants who Facebook, Tweet or Google during a seminar, but no one objected when some of the 14 participants in a new fellowship program for Jewish educators did just that during a lively lecture. 

Tuesday, The Rabbi Learns

Associate Editor
01/15/2010

 When Jewish leaders talk about underserved populations in need of attention, they often mention the poor, the elderly, unaffiliated 20-somethings, nontraditional families, people with disabilities and so on.

Ironically, those whose needs often go overlooked, however, are right under our proverbial shnozzes: the rabbis.

Working The Land Of Israel

Staff Writer
01/15/2010

 For Yeshiva University sophomore Josh Zimmerman, one of the highlights of his winter break was a day of harvesting peppers, plucking up tangled vegetable roots, picking up garbage from the sand and repairing a decrepit greenhouse for a community of Jewish refugees — all with 11 of his peers in Israel’s Negev Desert.

How Green Is My Summer Camp

Special to The Jewish Week
01/15/2010

When her parents last year asked her if she wanted to attend a sleepaway summer camp for the first time, Lucy Nye, a third-grader at a Jewish day school in Los Angeles, left no doubt what she thought of the idea.

“Mom, I hate camp” is what she told her parents, recalled her mother, Jennifer Nye, a rabbinical student at the Academy for Jewish Religion. Her reluctance may have had something to do with the fact that “she never even had a sleepover away from home,” her mother added.

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