Food & Wine

A Cornucopia Of Hamantaschen

Try your tri-cornered treats with lemon, peanut butter, apple or coconut.

Jewish Week Online Columnist

These days, the biggest trend in the classic Purim treats is wild and wacky flavors - in both the dough and the filling - like these red velvet variety from What Jew Wanna Eat, or rum-raisin from Trini Gourmet or this pear and goat cheese offering from Joy of Kosher.

Ingredients
Ingredients: 
1 1/2 cups sweetened, shredded coconut
1/2 cup (1 stick) butter or margarine, softened
1 cup sugar
2 eggs
1 teaspoon vanilla
2 1/2 cups flour
2 tablespoons plus 1 teaspoon cocoa
1/4 teaspoon baking soda
2 teaspoons baking powder
1/4 teaspoon salt
Sub Recipes
Sub Recipe: 
Raspberry Filling:
 
8 ounces raspberries (I used frozen)
¼ cup water
1/3 cup sugar
1 tablespoon lemon juice
½ cup raspberry jam
 

Blend together the raspberries, water, sugar and lemon juice. Mix in the jam.

A Foodie Mission to Israel

JFNA to offer food-centric spring tour.

03/13/2014
Food and Wine Editor
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Courtesy of JFNA

The Definitive NYC Hamantaschen Guide

Where to buy the tri-cornered treats this Purim.

03/12/2014
Food and Wine Editor
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It’s that time of year again, folks: Purim! And for most children—and quite a few adults, too—the star of this holiday is the humble tri-cornered hamantaschen. In an ideal world, all hamantaschen would have a crisp, not-too-sweet crust filled with a generous amount of soft filling, but let’s face it: all too often, bakeries around town churn out dry, crumbly cookies with only the barest hint of prune, poppy or apricot inside.

The Definitive NYC Hamantaschen Guide

Hey, Readers: We Want Your Family Recipes!

Share those classic Jewish dishes with fellow foodies.

03/10/2014
Food and Wine Editor
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A Halvah Hamentasch

The Purim classic is often disappointing, so we made it more rich and tender with an updated filling and dough.

03/10/2014
Jewish Week Online Columnist
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Welcome to our new series in which we seek to gently tweak the anachronisms of the Jewish culinary canon (shav, we’re looking at you). With a little bit of love, we’re convinced we can reclaim the dishes that seem the strangest to the modern palate. Sweet and sour tongue, anyone?

First up, because it’s that time of year: hamantaschen. They’re cookies, so what could be bad, right? Sadly, plenty.

 An ecumenical treat boasting Ashkenazi origins and Sephardi influences. Amy Kritzer

A Sweet, Ethically-Sourced Passover

Kosher chocolate goes fair trade in a partnership between T'ruah and Fair Trade Judaica.

03/07/2014
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Courtesy of Fair Trade Judaica

Is It Worth It?

A reflection on the price of wine.

03/07/2014
Special to the Jewish Week
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One question we get asked about wine is, “Is it worth the money?”

Worth, like beauty, is subjective. Indeed, asking the “worth” question is really another way of asking, “Is it worth it to you?” It’s clear, though, that what people really mean when they ask this question is, “Do you think this is worth it to me?” So how does one begin to answer that?

Courtesy of Dalton Winery

Layers Of Goodness

Tuck one of these peanut butter-topped brownies into your Purim packages this year.

Jewish Week Online Columnist

If it ain't broke, don't fix it. That saying probably wasn't meant to apply to the heavenly combination of peanut butter and chocolate, but it works just the same. Reese's Peanut Butter Cups were invented in 1928, and the combo has simply stuck around.

Ingredients
Ingredients: 
150g semisweet chocolate, roughly chopped
1/2 cup (1 stick) butter or margarine
1/2 tsp instant espresso powder or instant coffee powder
3/4 cup sugar
1/4 cup light brown sugar
2 eggs plus one egg yolk
1 teaspoon vanilla
1/2 cup plus 2 tablespoons flour
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 tablespoon dark unsweetened cocoa powder
1 cup peanut butter
1/2 cup powdered sugar
175g semisweet or milk chocolate, finely chopped OR 1 cup chocolate chips

Checking In On Peck’s

Ratner’s family-owned Brooklyn food shop teams up with Gefilteria.

03/05/2014
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Peck's opened on Myrtle Avenue in January. Lauren Rothman/JW

Sparkle Up Your Purim

In praise of the Champagne-like, yet affordable, Cava.

03/04/2014
Special To The Jewish Week
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When it comes to victory celebrations, the ubiquitous wine of choice is Champagne, that almost magical sparkler from Northern France. At sporting events, winners drink Champagne from trophies. Ship captains launch their vessels by smashing a bottle on the prow. In military messes, officers have long quaffed the bubbly to celebrate victories old, new and not yet won.

Cava is just as festive — but much less expensive — than kosher champagne. Courtesy of Freixenet
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