Food & Wine

Celebrating Citrus, Winter's Seasonal Fruit

Dip lime and coconut cookies in white chocolate and find bright flavor in a dark season.

Jewish Week Online Columnist

In these cold winter months, its still possible to get bright pops of flavor in your food in the form of citrus! Oranges, grapefruits, lemons and limes all have sharp, delicious flavors that are perfect in a variety of baked goods (see lemon curd linzer torte, orange chocolate tart or coconut grapefruit cupcakes).

Ingredients
Ingredients: 
1/2 cup unsweetened shredded coconut
1 1/2 cups sugar
zest of one large lime
1 cup (2 sticks) butter or margarine, softened
1 egg
1/2 teaspoon vanilla
3 tablespoons lime juice
2 3/4 cups all-purpose flour
1 teaspoon baking soda
1/2 teaspoon baking powder
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 cup white chocolate chips

Christmas Envy Panettone Trifle

If you think New York is a tough place to be a Jew on Christmas, try Venice.

Jewish Week Online Columnist

Every year, right after Thanksgiving, New York City seems to turn overnight into one giant display of dazzling Christmas ornaments. The lure of illuminated store windows and sweet-smelling candy canes is hard to resist for adults, and just impossible for young Jewish children.

Ingredients
Ingredients: 
1 panettone (home-made or store-bought) or use sponge cake or lady finger cookies
1/3 cup Frangelico or Disaronno (skip and use just decaf coffee if you have kids)
2 cups decaf espresso, sweetened
For the custard:
1/2 cup sugar
6 yolks
5 tablespoons cornstarch
4 cups whole milk
1 vanilla bean or 1 tablespoon vanilla extract
For decorating:
1/2 cup toasted hazelnuts, coarsely ground
A few cherries in syrup, or fresh berries
1/2 cup whipped cream or/and chocolate shavings if desired

Pastrami On Rye Potstickers

Holy night! Fried and served with a spicy mustard, these are the perfect Jewish Chinese Christmas treat.

Jewish Week Online Columnist

I’m a Jew who likes Christmas. Though not for the traditional reasons. I mean mistletoe, eggnog and sparkly lights are great and all, but I’m in it for the Chinese food. Like other Chosen People on this lonely day, I indulge in whatever action flick is in the theaters, and as much moo shu and fried rice as I can handle.

Ingredients
Ingredients: 
1 cup rye flour
1 cup all-purpose flour
1/2 - 3/4 cup water
1 teaspoon caraway seeds
1/4 teaspoon salt
1 tablespoon peanut oil or schmaltz
1/2 cup red onion, small diced
2 tablespoons kosher dill pickles, small diced
1/2 pound pastrami, rough chopped
Peanut oil, vegetable oil or schmaltz
2 tablespoons dry mustard
2 tablespoons hot water

From Syosset To Tokyo

Meet noodle impressario Ivan Ramen, born Orkin in Syosset.

12/18/2013
Web Editor
Story Includes Video: 
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Ivan Orkin’s ramen is acclaimed by even the biggest noodle nerds, but what we’re more interested in his backstory. How did a Jewish kid from Syosset become Ivan Ramen, as he’s known?

Ivan Orkin/Ramen recently opened a new noodle shop, and published a memoir. Daniel Krieger

Never For Breakfast

Seville oranges are small, bumpy and perfect for punch.

12/17/2013
Special To The Jewish Week
Story Includes Video: 
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This is one of my favorite times of year. No, I’m not talking about the “holiday season” but rather the time when two exotic culinary treats come into season — Périgord truffles (which have become far too costly for me to actually buy) and Seville oranges. 

Seville oranges are small, sour and were never for breakfast. But they're perfect for punch. Fotolia

Chinese On Christmas

‘The Goldbergs’ creator on that Jewish culinary ritual.

12/17/2013
Special To The Jewish Week
Story Includes Video: 
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It’s easy to feel like you really know Adam Goldberg. He’s warm and funny. He asks questions with genuine interest and listens attentively. Having a conversation with him quickly makes you feel like you’re talking to an old friend. Another reason it’s easy to feel like you know him is because, if you’ve seen ABC’s hit sitcom, “The Goldbergs,” which he writes and produces, you’ve had an inside look at his 1980s childhood in the Philadelphia suburb of Jenkintown, Pa.

The TV versions of their creators' real-life family, which celebrated Christmas with Chinese. Image courtesy ABC

A Condiment Quarantined

California says sriracha must be held to treat micro-organisms.

12/17/2013
Web Editor
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You know we love sriracha around here, so we’re a bit alarmed by all this talk of a #srirachapocalypse in the Twittersphere.

Will supplies last? Getty Images

Kosherize It

The Jewish Christmas tradition of Chinese food meets an iconic combination in Lox and Cream Cheese Rangoon.

Jewish Week Online Columnist

For many people, Christmas conjures up thoughts of Santa Claus, mistletoe and eggnog. If you’re Jewish, however, Christmas probably makes you think of Chinese food.

Ingredients
Ingredients: 
6 ounces refrigerated smoked salmon, chopped
2 8-ounce packages of cream cheese, brought to room temperature
1 handful chives, chopped finely
1/2 teaspoon fresh ground black pepper
1 package of square wonton wrappers
Vegetable oil for frying
Bottled sweet-and-sour sauce, for serving

A New, If Slightly Pseudo, Fish Sauce Arrives

Lend an added authenticity to your Asian-style cooking by trying this new, reliably hekshered fish sauce.

Jewish Week Online Columnist

Click here for Ronnie Fein Reviews: Queen of Tuna-brand Tuna Fish Sauce.

Remember that nam pla is not intended for sprinkling straight from the bottle onto food. It’s not like ketchup, Worcestershire sauce or tabasco, but more in the nature of tomato paste or hoisin sauce, to be used for cooking.

Ingredients
Ingredients: 
For Chicken:
1 whole boneless chicken breast
4 tablespoons vegetable oil
2 tablespoons fish sauce
1 tablespoon honey
For Dressing:
1/4 cup fish sauce
1/4 cup vegetable oil
6 tablespoons lime juice
2 tablespoons brown sugar
Cayenne pepper to taste, optional
1/2 cup chopped cashews, optional
For Salad:
8 ounces rice noodles, spaghetti or linguine shape
3 carrots, cut into julienne strips
2 stalks celery, cut into julienne strips
1 medium zucchini, cut into julienne strips
1 serrano pepper, deseeded and chopped
3 tablespoons chopped fresh cilantro
3 tablespoons chopped fresh mint
2 medium cloves garlic, finely chopped
The stirfried chicken

Ronnie Fein Reviews: Queen Of Tuna-brand Tuna Fish Sauce

12/09/2013
Jewish Week Online Columnist
Story Includes Video: 
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Your kosher Grandma probably never heard of nam pla or nuoc nam, the pungent tasting fish sauce used ubiquitously in Thai and Vietnamese cooking. In fact, if she took one whiff of the sauce’s fishy odor, she might have thrown it away on the assumption it was spoiled.

Click the link at the bottom of the article for this recipe, made of course with fish sauce. Ronnie Fein
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