Recipes

Kosher And Chinese, And Leftovers

Turn a carton of uneaten rice into a quick, tasty dinner.

Jewish Week Online Columnist

Jews love Chinese food. It's well-documented, and even the subject of a paper I wrote in college (I got an A-). But here's another thing we love: leftovers. And the two often go hand in hand: who hasn't ended up with a cardboard carton of white rice in the fridge after indulging in some beef lo mein or General Tso's chicken?

Ingredients
Ingredients: 
2 tablespoons canola or sesame oil
1 medium onion, peeled and chopped
Veggies of your choice - shredded carrots, chopped mushrooms, zucchini, peppers, etc.
2 cups precooked rice
2 large eggs
1 tablespoon soy sauce
Salt and pepper, to taste

A Cornucopia Of Hamantaschen

Try your tri-cornered treats with lemon, peanut butter, apple or coconut.

Jewish Week Online Columnist

These days, the biggest trend in the classic Purim treats is wild and wacky flavors - in both the dough and the filling - like these red velvet variety from What Jew Wanna Eat, or rum-raisin from Trini Gourmet or this pear and goat cheese offering from Joy of Kosher.

Ingredients
Ingredients: 
1 1/2 cups sweetened, shredded coconut
1/2 cup (1 stick) butter or margarine, softened
1 cup sugar
2 eggs
1 teaspoon vanilla
2 1/2 cups flour
2 tablespoons plus 1 teaspoon cocoa
1/4 teaspoon baking soda
2 teaspoons baking powder
1/4 teaspoon salt
Sub Recipes
Sub Recipe: 
Raspberry Filling:
 
8 ounces raspberries (I used frozen)
¼ cup water
1/3 cup sugar
1 tablespoon lemon juice
½ cup raspberry jam
 

Blend together the raspberries, water, sugar and lemon juice. Mix in the jam.

Hey, Readers: We Want Your Family Recipes!

Share those classic Jewish dishes with fellow foodies.

03/10/2014
Food and Wine Editor
Story Includes Video: 
0

A Halvah Hamentasch

The Purim classic is often disappointing, so we made it more rich and tender with an updated filling and dough.

03/10/2014
Jewish Week Online Columnist
Story Includes Video: 
0

Welcome to our new series in which we seek to gently tweak the anachronisms of the Jewish culinary canon (shav, we’re looking at you). With a little bit of love, we’re convinced we can reclaim the dishes that seem the strangest to the modern palate. Sweet and sour tongue, anyone?

First up, because it’s that time of year: hamantaschen. They’re cookies, so what could be bad, right? Sadly, plenty.

 An ecumenical treat boasting Ashkenazi origins and Sephardi influences. Amy Kritzer

Layers Of Goodness

Tuck one of these peanut butter-topped brownies into your Purim packages this year.

Jewish Week Online Columnist

If it ain't broke, don't fix it. That saying probably wasn't meant to apply to the heavenly combination of peanut butter and chocolate, but it works just the same. Reese's Peanut Butter Cups were invented in 1928, and the combo has simply stuck around.

Ingredients
Ingredients: 
150g semisweet chocolate, roughly chopped
1/2 cup (1 stick) butter or margarine
1/2 tsp instant espresso powder or instant coffee powder
3/4 cup sugar
1/4 cup light brown sugar
2 eggs plus one egg yolk
1 teaspoon vanilla
1/2 cup plus 2 tablespoons flour
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 tablespoon dark unsweetened cocoa powder
1 cup peanut butter
1/2 cup powdered sugar
175g semisweet or milk chocolate, finely chopped OR 1 cup chocolate chips

Crispy Coconut Haddock

This kosher spin on tropical crispy shrimp is light and easy to make.

Jewish Week Online Columnist

Crispy fried coconut shrimp are delicious, but they’re full of fat—and obviously not kosher. In this healthier baked version, I skewer haddock fillets and serve them with spicy sriracha sauce for dipping. 

This fun-to-eat version of the classic tropical treat is every bit as tasty, but much lighter. I like to serve it on its own as an appetizer, or over rice next to a crunchy Asian-style slaw for a light lunch or dinner.

Ingredients
Ingredients: 
Cooking spray
1 tablespoon soy sauce
2 teaspoons sriracha or other Asian chili sauce, plus more for dipping
2 teaspoons honey
1/2 teaspoon ground black pepper
1 pound haddock or other firm white fish, cut into 2”-thick strips
1 egg, beaten
3/4 cup Japanese panko breadcrumbs
1/2 cup unsweetened flaked coconut

A One-Ingredient Wonder

Make a fun, healthy snack with just one thing: apples.

Jewish Week Online Columnist

I'm definitely sometimes guilty of over-complicating things. A chocolate cake with 14 ingredients? It's happened. But this recipe is compensation for all that. It's super simple, fun, easy and delicious. And it contains just one ingredient that you probably already have in the fridge!

Ingredients
Ingredients: 
1 apple (I used Golden Delicious)

Halvah Hamantaschen

An updated filling and dough bring richness and tenderness to an often-disappointing Purim classic.

Jewish Week Online Columnist

Welcome to our new series in which we seek to gently tweak the anachronisms of the Jewish culinary canon (shav, we’re looking at you). With a little bit of love, we’re convinced we can reclaim the dishes that seem the strangest to the modern palate. Sweet and sour tongue, anyone?

Ingredients
Ingredients: 
For the Dough:
¾ cup granulated sugar
2 cups all-purpose flour, sifted
1½ teaspoons baking powder
¼ teaspoon salt
1 stick butter, softened
½ teaspoon vanilla extract
2 eggs
2 tablespoons orange juice
For the Filling:
1 cup tahini paste
1 cup powdered sugar
Water, as needed
2 tablespoons sesame seeds, for garnish

Hearty Soup, Biblical Style

Stay warm and full with this classic dish, a helping of lentils in every bite.

Online Jewish Week Columnist

It's one of the most ancient recipes in the world. The Torah tells how Esau returned from hunting in the fields, starving. He finds his brother Jacob cooking a pot of red lentil stew. Esau is so hungry, he agrees to give up his birthright in exchange for some soup.

Ingredients
Ingredients: 
2 tablespoons oil
1 large onion, peeled and diced
1/2 teaspoon black pepper
1/2 teaspoon cumin
1/2 teaspoon turmeric
1 teaspoon paprika
1 teaspoon kosher salt
3 cloves garlic, peeled and minced
1 1/2 cups green or black lentils
1 cup (8 ounces) tomato paste
5-6 cups vegetable stock or water

Reimagining The Cherry Cordial

Spiff up the candy box classic with these little brownie bites.

Jewish Week Online Columnist

Have you ever had a cherry cordial? Chances are, if you've ever gotten a box of chocolates as a gift (say, for Valentine's Day?), you have. It's a chocolate shell filled with a candied cherry and syrup. They're not my favorites in the box - more of the one I'll take a bite of and put back - mostly because they have a very artificial cherry flavor. Whatever may once have been a cherry is obscured by the sugary-sweet syrup.

Ingredients
Ingredients: 
11 ounces dark chocolate, chopped
1 cup (2 sticks) butter or margarine
1 tsp instant espresso powder or instant coffee powder
1 1/2 cups sugar
1/2 cup light brown sugar
5 eggs
2 teaspoons vanilla
1 1/4 cups flour
1 tsp salt
2 tbsps dark unsweetened cocoa powder
2/3 cup dried cherries, roughly chopped
Syndicate content