Recipes

A Lemony Passover Treat

Jewish Week Online Columnist

These frozen meringue desserts will have you forgetting all about chametz.

There's nothing worse than finishing up your seder with a cake that tastes like... matzah. But when it comes to Passover baking, that's often the case: Matzah meal replaces the flour, leaving desserts that are heavy and dense, with that unappealing flavor. No more! This delicious gluten-free dessert forgets all about matzah, using only natural ingredients for the perfect light, sweet end to your seder.

Food tags: 
lemon
Passover
dessert
meringue
frozen
ice cream
Ingredients
Ingredients: 
Meringue:
4 egg whites
1 cup (200g) superfine sugar
2 teaspoons potato starch
Filling:
4 egg yolks
1/2 cup (100g) superfine sugar
zest of two lemons
6 tablespoons lemon juice
1 cup heavy cream or non-dairy cream

Potatoes for Passover, Upgraded

Jewish Week Online Columnist

Don't skimp on the wow factor this holiday with these fun, filled spud cups.

Potatoes, potatoes, potatoes. They're pretty much a staple of every Passover meal: Without bread or pasta, potatoes are the go-to carb. Now, I love potatoes, so I'm happy to see them over and over again, but sometimes even I get bored of the classic roasted or mashed. These lacy little shredded potato cups, which you can fill with just about anything, are a great way to add a little wow factor to the taste and presentation of your next potato dish. 

Food tags: 
Passover
potatoes
side dish
kugel
mini
stir-fry
cups
presentation
appetizer
individual
Ingredients
Ingredients: 
Cups:
4 large russet potatoes
1 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon garlic powder
1/2 teaspooon onion powder
Stir-Fry:
1 large onion (or two small), peeled and diced
2 medium zucchini, diced
8 ounces mushrooms, diced
2 colored peppers, cored and diced
1 cup shredded carrots
2 teaspoons balsamic vinegar
1 tablespoon honey
Salt and pepper, to taste

The Remix: Tackling Matzah

Jewish Week Online Columnist

Don't like matzah? You probably will when it's rolled into these dark chocolate truffles.

This is the second installment of our new series "The Remix" in which we seek to gently tweak the more challenging dishes in the Jewish culinary cannon. With a little bit of love, we’re convinced we can make even these dishes delicious, even the ones that seem bizarre to the modern palate.

Food tags: 
truffles
Passover dessert
matzah
chocolate truffles
chocolate covered matzah
Ingredients
Ingredients: 
1/3 cup heavy cream
5 ounces (about ¾ cup) dark chocolate, roughly chopped
¼ cup butter, at room temperature
1 piece matzah, finely chopped
1 ½ cups kosher for Passover powdered sugar
3 tablespoons Manischewitz (or to taste)
Sea salt

A New, Improved Sponge Cake For Passover

Jewish Week Online Columnist

Custardy zabaglione and roasted orange slices modernize the once-passe dessert.

Sponge cake is the new flourless chocolate cake.

Food tags: 
sponge cake
Passover dessert
zabaglione
roasted fruit
Ingredients
Ingredients: 
For the sponge cake:
12 large eggs, at room temperature, separated
1 ¾ cups sugar
6 tablespoons orange juice
¼ cup lemon juice
2 tablespoons orange zest, from oranges used to make roasted orange slices (recipe below)
1 tablespoon lemon zest
1 cup matzo cake meal, sifted
1/3 cup potato starch
Passover zabaglione (recipe below)
Roasted orange slices (recipe below)
For the roasted orange slices:
6 navel oranges
2 tablespoons melted coconut oil
1 tablespoon sugar
½ teaspoon ground cinnamon
2 tablespoons finely chopped fresh mint
For the zabaglione:
8 large egg yolks
¾ cup sugar
2 tablespoons finely grated fresh orange peel, from oranges used to make roasted orange slices
½ cup sweet white Passover wine
Fresh mint leaves, for garnish

Yum

 

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Lauren Rothman
The Jewish Week
1501 Broadway, Suite 505
New YOrk, NY 10036

Kosher And Chinese, And Leftovers

Jewish Week Online Columnist

Turn a carton of uneaten rice into a quick, tasty dinner.

Jews love Chinese food. It's well-documented, and even the subject of a paper I wrote in college (I got an A-). But here's another thing we love: leftovers. And the two often go hand in hand: who hasn't ended up with a cardboard carton of white rice in the fridge after indulging in some beef lo mein or General Tso's chicken?

Food tags: 
rice
Chinese food
fried rice
egg-fried rice
chinese
leftovers
takeout
Ingredients
Ingredients: 
2 tablespoons canola or sesame oil
1 medium onion, peeled and chopped
Veggies of your choice - shredded carrots, chopped mushrooms, zucchini, peppers, etc.
2 cups precooked rice
2 large eggs
1 tablespoon soy sauce
Salt and pepper, to taste

A Cornucopia Of Hamantaschen

Jewish Week Online Columnist

Try your tri-cornered treats with lemon, peanut butter, apple or coconut.

These days, the biggest trend in the classic Purim treats is wild and wacky flavors - in both the dough and the filling - like these red velvet variety from What Jew Wanna Eat, or rum-raisin from Trini Gourmet or this pear and goat cheese offering from Joy of Kosher.

Food tags: 
Purim
coconut
chocolate
cookies
hamantaschen
hamantashen
fillings
raspberry
Ingredients
Ingredients: 
1 1/2 cups sweetened, shredded coconut
1/2 cup (1 stick) butter or margarine, softened
1 cup sugar
2 eggs
1 teaspoon vanilla
2 1/2 cups flour
2 tablespoons plus 1 teaspoon cocoa
1/4 teaspoon baking soda
2 teaspoons baking powder
1/4 teaspoon salt
Sub Recipes
Sub Recipe: 
Raspberry Filling:
 
8 ounces raspberries (I used frozen)
¼ cup water
1/3 cup sugar
1 tablespoon lemon juice
½ cup raspberry jam
 

Blend together the raspberries, water, sugar and lemon juice. Mix in the jam.

Hey, Readers: We Want Your Family Recipes!

Share those classic Jewish dishes with fellow foodies.

03/10/2014
Food and Wine Editor
Story Includes Video: 
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A Halvah Hamentasch

The Purim classic is often disappointing, so we made it more rich and tender with an updated filling and dough.

03/10/2014
Jewish Week Online Columnist
Story Includes Video: 
0

Welcome to our new series in which we seek to gently tweak the anachronisms of the Jewish culinary canon (shav, we’re looking at you). With a little bit of love, we’re convinced we can reclaim the dishes that seem the strangest to the modern palate. Sweet and sour tongue, anyone?

First up, because it’s that time of year: hamantaschen. They’re cookies, so what could be bad, right? Sadly, plenty.

 An ecumenical treat boasting Ashkenazi origins and Sephardi influences. Amy Kritzer

Layers Of Goodness

Jewish Week Online Columnist

Tuck one of these peanut butter-topped brownies into your Purim packages this year.

If it ain't broke, don't fix it. That saying probably wasn't meant to apply to the heavenly combination of peanut butter and chocolate, but it works just the same. Reese's Peanut Butter Cups were invented in 1928, and the combo has simply stuck around.

Food tags: 
chocolate
Purim
brownies
dessert
cookies
peanut butter
Ingredients
Ingredients: 
150g semisweet chocolate, roughly chopped
1/2 cup (1 stick) butter or margarine
1/2 tsp instant espresso powder or instant coffee powder
3/4 cup sugar
1/4 cup light brown sugar
2 eggs plus one egg yolk
1 teaspoon vanilla
1/2 cup plus 2 tablespoons flour
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 tablespoon dark unsweetened cocoa powder
1 cup peanut butter
1/2 cup powdered sugar
175g semisweet or milk chocolate, finely chopped OR 1 cup chocolate chips
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