The Arts

The Fringe Gets Religion

Two Jewish-themed works mine serious spiritual matters at iconoclastic theater festival.
08/09/2011 - 20:00
Special To The Jewish Week
Religion is not the first thing that one thinks of in connection with the Fringe Festival, the smorgasbord of zany, often ribald theatrical fare that springs up every August in New York. But this year’s Fringe includes two plays, both by Jewish playwrights, which take on serious religious themes — a retelling of  the Garden of Eden story and the feverish fictional monologue of a shamanistic rabbi.
The poet Alexander Nemser, whose one-man show is “Moshe Feldstein: Icon of Self-Realization.”

The Jewish Echoes In ‘The Fulbright Triptych’

Forty years after Simon Dinnerstein completed his monumental painting, the complex work is getting a fresh look.
08/08/2011 - 20:00
Staff Writer

Germany was not Simon Dinnerstein’s first choice for a Fulbright grant. But he didn’t have much of a choice. It was 1970, and the Brooklyn-based artist, then 27, was barely making a living. He first applied to work with a noted Spanish painter, only listing Germany, to study the art of engraving in the birthplace of Dürer, as a back up.

“Being Jewish is very complicated, but it’s somehow in my DNA,” Dinnerstein says. Cynthia Dantzic

The Jewish Echoes In ‘The Fulbright Triptych’

Forty years after Simon Dinnerstein completed his monumental painting, the complex work is getting a fresh look.
08/02/2011 - 20:00
Staff Writer

Germany was not Simon Dinnerstein’s first choice for a Fulbright grant. But he didn’t have much of a choice. It was 1970, and the Brooklyn-based artist, then 27, was barely making a living. He first applied to work with a noted Spanish painter, only listing Germany, to study the art of engraving in the birthplace of Dürer, as a back up.

Simon Dinnerstein: The Fulbright Triptych and Selected Works

‘Delirious Realism’ On Screen

Latinbeat festival highlights Jewish role in New Argentine Cinema.
08/02/2011 - 20:00
Special to the Jewish Week

This year’s Latinbeat Film Festival is a vivid reminder that Jewish filmmakers have been at the heart of the New Argentine Cinema for all of its roughly two decades of existence. Among the five new Argentine films playing the event, which opens on Aug. 10, are “Querida Voy a Comprar Cigarillos y Vuelvo,” directed by Mariano Cohn and Gaston Duprat, and “No Return,” directed by Miguel Cohan. You can add their names to a roster of festival veterans that already includes Martin Rejtman, Daniel Burman and Diego Lerman, among others.

The 12th annual Latinbeat Film Festival

Memories Of Home, In 3D

Maya Zack recreates a 1930s Berlin living room, complete with portents of doom.
08/01/2011 - 20:00
Staff Writer

Maya Zack wanted to get every detail right.

She pestered a German Jewish refugee, Manfred Nomburg, about every last detail of the Berlin home where he grew up: the wallpaper, the dining room china, the living room chairs. He had not seen his home in 70 years, when he escaped to Pre-state Israel.

But when Zack, 35, a prize-winning Israeli artist, turned all those details into a life-sized, computer-generated 3D work of art — titled “Living Room,” which goes on view at The Jewish Museum on Sunday — Nomburg did not recognize a thing.

Maya Zack

Sinatra, Under His Skin

Cary Hoffman’s love letter to Old Blue Eyes.
08/01/2011 - 20:00
Special To The Jewish Week

When does idolization cross over into obsession? Cary Hoffman, a shy Jewish kid growing up in postwar Queens, admired Frank Sinatra so much that he dreamed of becoming the singer himself. In Hoffman’s thought-provoking one-man show, “My Sinatra,” now playing Off-Broadway with musical direction by Alex Nelson, the performer interweaves the story of his infatuation with the singing of two dozen of the singer’s standards. His voice is so uncannily similar to Sinatra’s that few can tell them apart.

Cary Hoffman in "My Sinatra."

Memories Of Home, In 3D

Maya Zack recreates a 1930s Berlin living room, complete with portents of doom.
07/26/2011 - 20:00
Staff Writer

Maya Zack wanted to get every detail right.

She pestered a German Jewish refugee, Manfred Nomburg, about every last detail of the Berlin home where he grew up: the wallpaper, the dining room china, the living room chairs. He had not seen his home in 70 years, when he escaped to Israel.

Detail of Maya Zack’s “Living Room” (2009). Courtesy of the artist and the Alon Segev Gallery, Tel Aviv

Remembering Hitler, The Person

From the Fuhrer’s secretary to an uprising survivor, ‘Talking Head’ series features a range of voices from the Shoah.
07/26/2011 - 20:00
Special to the Jewish Week

The film critic and historian Andrew Sarris is fond of saying that sometimes the most cinematic choice in the world is just to show two people in a room talking. When it comes to nonfiction film, despite the derisive phrase “talking heads documentary,” if the subject is interesting enough and the people talking are compelling, Sarris is absolutely right.

Face of a hero: Yehuda Lerner bears witness in Claude Lanzmann’s film about the uprising at Sobibor. New Yorker Films

Sole Man

Danny Aiello bridges 9/11 and the Holocaust in ‘The Shoemaker.’
07/25/2011 - 20:00
Special To The Jewish Week

Whether it is the piles of shoes left behind by Holocaust victims or the countless footwear-inspired idioms — filling someone’s shoes, walking a mile in someone’s shoes, putting the shoe on the other foot — the shoe is arguably our most evocative and symbolic item of clothing.

Danny Aiello, an Italian-Jewish Holocaust survivor, and Alma Cuervo in scene from “The Shoemaker.” Photos by Ben Hider

Taboo, But Educational

Jewish version of popular Hasbro game gets clues from Encyclopedia Judaica.
07/20/2011 - 20:00
Staff Writer

When Seth Burstein and Ian Framson started throwing clues at each other while playing the card game “Taboo,” they came up with more than just a way to kill an afternoon.

The two Jewish friends and serial entrepreneurs, amused by the game that requires teams to guess topics without the most obvious hints, began offering a mix of Hebrew and Yiddish phrases to help one another.

Board of Jewish Education: Seth Burstein with his Hebrew-word packed game.
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