The Arts

Avner Dorman’s Musical Exoticism

Israeli Philharmonic to perform the young Israeli composer’s ‘Azerbaijani Dances’ here next week.

02/17/2011
Staff Writer

The Israel Philharmonic Orchestra will give the U.S. premiere of Israeli composer Avner Dorman’s “Azerbaijani Dance” at Carnegie Hall on Tuesday. But it will not be the first time the conductor, Zubin Mehta, one of the world’s most prominent maestros, collaborated with Dorman. In fact, Mehta essentially gave Dorman his start.

Avner Dorman's "Azerbaijani Dance" will be performed by the Israeli Philharmonic  next week at Carnegie Hall.

Black And Jewish, Searching For Home

02/15/2011

How are children affected by a parent’s racial and religious identities? In Lian Amaris’ new one-woman play, “Daddy’s Black and Jewish,” which premieres next week in the East Village, the performance artist reflects on her relationship with her adoptive father, the radical black intellectual Julius Lester, who converted to Judaism in 1982.

Lian Amaris’ “Daddy’s Black and Jewish” explores the impact her adoptive father, Julius Lester, has had on her identity.

No Direction Home

The themes of forced migration, rootlessness and anti-Semitism are all at play in video-opera ‘Moscow-NY.’

02/15/2011
Staff Writer

The video-opera “Moscow-NY,” which has its premiere at the JCC in Manhattan this weekend, is based on the life of Isaac Bashevis Singer — sort of.

“Moscow-NY,” at the JCC in Manhattan this weekend, incorporates a film.

Meyer Levin’s ‘Obsession’

Two current plays look at the writer’s quest to dramatize Anne Frank’s diary.

02/15/2011
Special To The Jewish Week

He was one of the leading literary lights of the 20th century, but it was another writer’s work that became the object of his obsession. Meyer Levin was a prolific Jewish writer who struggled fruitlessly for three decades to get the world to pay attention to his play about Anne Frank. Now, three decades after his death, Levin finally gets his due with two different plays about his quest on view simultaneously in New York.

Anne Frank, as puppet, and Mandy Patinkin in scene from "Compulsion."

Foreigners But Not Strangers

Film about unique south Tel Aviv school garners Oscar nomination.

02/09/2011
Special To The Jewish Week

To read the Israeli papers is to see a steady stream of stories bemoaning the country's public education system, especially those citing Israeli students' low test scores in science and math.

But American filmmakers Kirk Simon and Karen Goodman found a unique south Tel Aviv school that is doing all the right things with a dizzyingly diverse student body. Their documentary about the Bialik-Rogozin school, "Strangers No More," was just nominated for an Oscar in the documentary short category.

The Bialik-Rogozin school in S. Tel Aviv teaches a dizzyingly diverse group of youngsters, many the children of foreign workers

For Jewish-Kashmiri Filmmaker, ‘Identity Is Never Fixed’

Tariq Tapa’s debut film is in part a mirror of his complicated life.

02/08/2011
Special To The Jewish Week

Tariq Tapa had a complicated childhood. Not unpleasant, mind you, just unusually busy.

Bridging identities: Mohamad Imran Tapa in Tariq Tapa’s “Zero Bridge.” (The actor is a distant cousin of the filmmaker’s).

A Note Of Thanks

Help from South Orange synagogue
helped launch Russian pianist’s career.
Now, she’s a staple on the classical scene.

02/08/2011
Special To The Jewish Week

It was the death threats that forced a decision.

Up to that point, Irina Nuzova says, her father Vladimir had accepted the restrictions and minor humiliations of being a Jew in Soviet and post-Soviet Russia with understandable reluctance and stoicism. He had grudgingly resigned himself to being barred from the literary institute to which he had applied, and not being permitted to travel abroad. He had shrugged off having his “nationality” listed as “Jewish.”

Irina Nuzova will perform next week in the Concerts in the Heights series, and her new CD.

Freedom Seder?

‘The Whipping Man,’ with Passover at its center, revisits the horror of slavery in the South.

02/01/2011
Special To The Jewish Week

With its overarching message of freedom and redemption, Passover seems better suited to America than any other Jewish holiday. And one of the most striking aspects of Passover in this country is the appeal that it has for non-Jews, especially African-Americans

Jay Wilkison, André Braugher and André Holland in Matthew Lopez’s “The Whipping Man.”

For Young Musicians, The Reich Stuff

Playing celebrated composer’s ‘Tehillim’ is close encounter with a classic of modern music and Jewish culture.

02/01/2011
Staff Writer

‘Do it again! Kol han-sha ma ta-ha lail!” thundered Alan Pierson, conductor of the new music classical group Alarm Will Sound, at a rehearsal last week with the teenage ensemble Face the Music.

They were rehearsing Steve Reich’s seminal chorale piece, “Tehillim,” from 1981, which both ensembles performed together on Sunday at Merkin Concert Hall. Face the Music will continue to perform the piece throughout the city in upcoming weeks.

Student group Face the Music performed alongside the professional ensemble Alarm Will Sound Sunday. Photo:Meg Goldman

‘Confidence’ Man

Hungarian filmmaker Istvan Szabo and the nature of trust.

01/25/2011
Special To The Jewish Week

More than many filmmakers, Istvan Szabo understands issues of fear and trust viscerally. He and his parents, both of them Jewish doctors, survived the Holocaust in Hungary because friends hid them.

Scene from Istvan Szabo’s “Mephisto.”
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