The Arts

A Grunt’s-Eye-View Of Modern Combat

Samuel Fuller’s WWII epic ‘The Big Red One’ raises big moral questions.

09/25/2012
Special To The Jewish Week

Lee Marvin in “The Big Red One.” Warner Brothers

Model Congregations

YU Museum gathers together its scale models of synagogues the world over.

09/16/2014
Special To The Jewish Week
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Beginning this weekend, the Yeshiva University Museum is offering the opportunity to engage in Jewish tourism from its West 16th Street galleries.

A model of the Beit Alpha Synagogue from Israel’s Jezreel Valley. Courtesy of YU Museum

Two Outsiders Come In ‘From The Margins’

Abstract Expressionists Lee Krasner and Norman Lewis get a second look in Jewish Museum show.

09/16/2014
Special To The Jewish Week
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The pairing of two paintings in The Jewish Museum’s 2008 blockbuster exhibition, “Action Abstraction,” made a lasting impression on many, including the exhibit’s curator, Norman Kleeblatt.

Norman Lewis’ “Twilight Sounds” (1947) are part of new Jewish Museum show.©2014 The Pollack-Krasner Foundation/ARS

When A Hamas ‘Prince’ Turns

The complex relationship between a Palestinian spy and his Israeli handler forms the basis of ‘The Green Prince.’

09/16/2014
Special To The Jewish Week
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As the great American journalist I.F. Stone once said, “All governments lie,” and they never lie more freely than when they are conducting the business of spying. For all the professions of national, professional and tribal loyalties that are earnestly voiced throughout Nadav Schirman’s documentary film “The Green Prince,” which opens Sept. 12, it is ultimately personal loyalty that governs the behavior of its protagonists. That outcome feels entirely appropriate in a film about the hallucinatory world of counter-intelligence, double agents, lies and betrayals that Mosab Hassan Yousef and Gonen Ben Yitzhak inhabit. When everyone around you is a professional liar, you have to trust the person who tells you the truth, however reluctantly.

Mosab Hassan Yousef and Gonen Ben Yitzhak as spy and handler in “The Green Prince.”  Courtesy of Music Box Films

Film Review: 'This Is Where I Leave You'

Grassroots critic Joan Alperin takes on the Jewiest movie out there. Spoiler: She absolutely love love love love loves it.

When A Hamas ‘Prince’ Turns

The complex relationship between a Palestinian spy and his Israeli handler forms the basis of ‘The Green Prince.’

09/10/2014
Special To The Jewish Week
Story Includes Video: 
0

As the great American journalist I.F. Stone once said, “All governments lie,” and they never lie more freely than when they are conducting the business of spying. For all the professions of national, professional and tribal loyalties that are earnestly voiced throughout Nadav Schirman’s documentary film “The Green Prince,” which opens Sept. 12, it is ultimately personal loyalty that governs the behavior of its protagonists. That outcome feels entirely appropriate in a film about the hallucinatory world of counter-intelligence, double agents, lies and betrayals that Mosab Hassan Yousef and Gonen Ben Yitzhak inhabit. When everyone around you is a professional liar, you have to trust the person who tells you the truth, however reluctantly.

Mosab Hassan Yousef and Gonen Ben Yitzhak in “The Green Prince.” Courtesy of Music Box Films

King David As ‘Collage’

David Wolpe tackles the grace, and the contradictions, of the biblical monarch.

09/09/2014
Culture Editor
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The young David is captured in Michelangelo’s colossal marble masterpiece, in the days before his battle with Goliath. The sculptor expresses his beauty and hints of the boy’s majestic future. That’s the David a reader pictures in the opening pages of Rabbi David Wolpe’s new biography, “David: The Divided Heart” (Yale University Press), when the High Priest Samuel visits the house of Jesse the Bethlehemite in search of a new king to replace Saul. Before meeting David, Samuel encounters his older brothers.  David is then summoned back from the fields, where he is tending the sheep, and his life is about to change.

Rabbi David Wolpe

Bearing Up

09/09/2014
Special To The Jewish Week
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How much suffering can a person bear? Suzanne Tanner’s “Beyond Me: A Song Cycle in the Key of Survival” is a one-woman multimedia show based on the tragic experiences of Rachel Goldman Miller, a Parisian Jewish Holocaust survivor who lost her parents, sister and two brothers to the Nazis, and then, after coming to America and starting a new life, lost a son to AIDS. The play runs next Saturday evening at the United Solo Festival in Midtown.

“Beyond Me,” a one-woman multimedia shows, tells the story of a Holocaust survivor who has endured many losses. Deirdre Price

Surviving Auschwitz, Times Two

Czech actress and athlete are focus of ‘The Good and the True.’

09/03/2014
Special To The Jewish Week
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They may be equally hair-raising and heartrending, but no two stories of survival in Auschwitz are exactly the same.

Isobel Pravda and Saul Reichlin star in “The Good and the True.” Svandovo Divadlo

Sprinting Toward Understanding

09/02/2014
Special To The Jewish Week
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It was the disappointment of a lifetime. Two Jewish sprinters, Marty Glickman and Sam Stoller, were suddenly dropped from the U.S. track team at the 1936 Summer Olympics (known as the “Nazi Olympics”) in Berlin in favor of two African-American athletes, Jesse Owens and Ralph Metcalfe. In “Olympics Über Alles,” a play by Samuel J. Bernstein and Marguerite Krupp, the incident becomes the catalyst for a controversial contemporary museum exhibit in New York. The play began performances last week in Midtown.

Joshua Quat, Michael Engberg as the Jewish sprinters Marty Glickman and Sam Stoller in “Olympics Über Alles.”  Carol Rosegg
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