The Arts

A Grunt’s-Eye-View Of Modern Combat

Samuel Fuller’s WWII epic ‘The Big Red One’ raises big moral questions.

09/25/2012
Special To The Jewish Week

Lee Marvin in “The Big Red One.” Warner Brothers

Cycle Of (Family) Life

A dysfunctional family is at center of Pilobolus dance troupe’s collaboration with Israeli fiction writer Etgar Keret.

07/22/2014
Special To The Jewish Week
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In their utter dependence and sheer vulnerability, children often keep dysfunctional families from spinning apart. But can children also provide the energy and drive to keep their family going? An acrobatic new dance by the modern dance company Pilobolus, “The Inconsistent Pedaler,” centers on a teenage girl whose family members lose all their energy and momentum as soon as she stops pedaling her stationary bicycle.

In “The Inconsistent Pedaler,” a mysterious stranger teaches a family’s teenage daughter to ride calmly. Robert Whitman

‘Wish’: Hits, And Misses

Zach Braff plays dreamer, family man in new film chock-full of Jewish references.

07/22/2014
Jewish Week Online Columnist
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In “Wish I Was Here,” Zach Braff’s character, Aidan Bloom, has a question that many Jewish parents share. How am I going to pay the children’s yeshiva tuition?

An image from Braff's Kickstarter campaign, which helped finance the film. Via Kickstarter.com

Now You See Her…

07/15/2014
Special To The Jewish Week
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Is the border between life and death more permeable than we imagine? In Patrick Emile’s new musical, “As We Lie Still,” a Jewish magician in Jazz Age New York performs a shocking, mind-bending trick every night on stage — until the fateful night when the trick fails, and his life and career are changed forever. “As We Lie Still” is running at the New York Musical Theatre Festival (NYMF) in Midtown.

Patrick Emile’s “As We Lie Still” investigates the border between life and death. Courtesy of Patrick Emile

The Music Of Spanish Exile

In her N.Y. debut, a Catalan singer and lutenist moves from Sephardic songs to John Donne.

07/15/2014
Special To The Jewish Week
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Clara Sanabras knows something about exile. The thirty-something Catalan singer was born in France, raised in Barcelona and for the past 20 years has lived in London. Her family history is so complicated that even she finds it a bit amusing. Her career path has had enough unlikely turns for an entire music festival.

The cover of Sanabras’ new CD, translated as “Scattered Flight.” Hill & Aubrey

Channeling Lenny

Hershey Felder’s one-man show about ‘Maestro’ Leonard Bernstein.

07/09/2014
Special To The Jewish Week
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He captivated a nation with the power of classical music, but failed in his lifelong ambition to become a major composer in his own right. With an outsize talent, and an ego to match, Leonard Bernstein led millions to an understanding and appreciation of classical music. Now, pianist Hershey Felder channels the great musician in “Maestro,” a performance at Town Hall next Thursday night. When it ran last month in Northern California, critic Robert Hurwitt of the San Francisco Chronicle called the 100-minute show a “blend of biography, humor, piano virtuosity, pathos and musical appreciation.”

Hershey Felder as Leonard Bernstein in "Maestro." Michael Lamont

Now You See Her…

For a Jewish magician in Jazz Age New York, a trick goes awry.

07/09/2014
Special to the Jewish Week
Story Includes Video: 
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Is the border between life and death more permeable than we imagine? In Patrick Emile’s new musical, “As We Lie Still,” a Jewish magician in Jazz Age New York performs a shocking, mind-bending trick every night on stage — until the fateful night when the trick fails, and his life and career are changed forever. “As We Lie Still” premieres July 14 at the New York Musical Theatre Festival (NYMF) in Midtown.

Magic touch? Scene from Patrick Emile's new musical, "As We Lie Still." Courtesy of Patrick Emile

‘The Passenger’ Resurrects Long-Forgotten Jewish Composer

Houston Grand Opera tackles Mieczysław Weinberg’s Shoah-tinged work in a N.Y. premiere.

07/08/2014
Special To The Jewish Week
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Shmuel Weinberg survived the infamous pogrom at Kishinev, Moldova. His father and grandfather weren’t as lucky. In 1916 Shmuel walked to Warsaw, where he settled, and became a popular violinist and conductor of Yiddish theater music. When the Nazis invaded Poland many years later, Shmuel’s son Mieczysław Weinberg, a piano prodigy and budding classical composer, reversed his father’s path, walking east to the Soviet Union. His kid sister Esther set out with him but turned back after a day or two. It was the last time Mieczysław would see any of his family alive; they were transported to the concentration camp at Trawniki, where they were murdered by the Nazis.

Michelle Bredt, right, plays an SS officer who thinks she recognizes one of her concentration camp prisoners on a cruise ship.

‘The Passenger’ Resurrects Long-Forgotten Jewish Composer

Houston Grand Opera tackles Mieczysław Weinberg’s Shoah-tinged work in a N.Y. premiere.

07/03/2014
Special To The Jewish Week
Story Includes Video: 
0

Shmuel Weinberg survived the infamous pogrom at Kishinev, Moldova. His father and grandfather weren’t as lucky. In 1916 Shmuel walked to Warsaw, where he settled, and became a popular violinist and conductor of Yiddish theater music. When the Nazis invaded Poland many years later, Shmuel’s son Mieczysław Weinberg, a piano prodigy and budding classical composer, reversed his father’s path, walking east to the Soviet Union. His kid sister Esther set out with him but turned back after a day or two. It was the last time Mieczysław would see any of his family alive; they were transported to the concentration camp at Trawniki, where they were murdered by the Nazis.

Scene from Houston Grand Opera's production of Mieczyslaw Weinberg's "The Passenger." Lynne Lane

Free Book Excerpt from the Rebbe

 

Free Book Excerpt From The "Rebbe"

 
The first in a series of free books excerpts from The Jewish Week:
 
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