The Arts

A Grunt’s-Eye-View Of Modern Combat

Samuel Fuller’s WWII epic ‘The Big Red One’ raises big moral questions.

09/25/2012
Special To The Jewish Week

Lee Marvin in “The Big Red One.” Warner Brothers

A Writer Of A Certain Age (And Temperament)

Brian Morton’s latest literary creation is a feisty New York character through and through.

10/21/2014
Culture Editor
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What distinguishes a New York novel are not just the streetscapes, but also the pull this great city has on its characters. The eponymous Florence Gordon is one of those fictional New Yorkers who believe that “a life that took place elsewhere couldn’t truly be called life.”

Novelist Brian Morton’s latest work is a kind of generational tug of war.  David Kumin

Caught In History’s Maelstrom

10/21/2014
Special To The Jewish Week
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Mass migrations and persecutions can be difficult for us to comprehend, since they involve so many people and so many overlapping historical trajectories. Actress Pippa White finds a way into these wrenching social and political shifts through a laser- sharp focus on individuals caught up in the maelstrom of history. In two one-woman shows, “Voices from the Resistance” and “Voices from Ellis Island,” White brings to life the true stories of those daring men and women who risked their lives for freedom. Each show runs next week for one performance only at the United Solo Festival in Midtown.

Actress Pippa White performs roles of women resisting the Nazis, and coming to the U.S., in show at Theatre Row.

For Young Polish Jews, ‘Return To A New Life’

Adam Zucker’s documentary looks at the rebirth of Jewish life through the lens of four women.

10/21/2014
Staff Writer
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A veteran film editor and director-producer of several documentaries, all of which center on the African-American experience, Adam Zucker won a travel grant to Poland in 2008. He had not been there before, and had only distant family ties to the country.

Scenes from “The Return,” which premieres here this week.

Islam And Judaism On This Dinner Menu

Ayad Akhtar’s Pulitzer-winning ‘Disgraced’ asks broad questions about the interplay between the two faiths.

10/14/2014
Special To The Jewish Week
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‘Islam comes from the desert,” says the character Amir over dinner at his lavish Manhattan apartment. “From a group of tough- minded, tough-living people who saw life as something … to be suffered. Jews reacted to the situation differently. They turned it over and over and over. I mean look at the Talmud. They’re looking at things from a hundred different angles. … Muslims don’t think about it. They submit.”

The cast of “Disgraced.”  Andrew Eccles

The Long Wait

10/14/2014
Special To The Jewish Week
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Fed up with decades of slaving away at Lindy’s, waiters at that iconic Jewish eatery used to joke about writing a tell-all memoir, “I’ve Waited Long Enough.” Brad Zimmerman knows the feeling. After 29 years of waiting tables as an unemployed actor, he finally has his own one-man stand-up show, “My Son the Waiter: A Jewish Tragedy,” in which he chronicles his agonizing odyssey to the stage. When it ran in June in Southern California, critic Pam Kragen of the San Diego Union-Tribune called the show “witty and deeply personal … part confessional, part therapy session and part black comedy.” It opens this Sunday on the Upper West Side.

Brad Zimmerman in his one-man show,  “My Son, the Waiter: A Jewish Tragedy.”  Ken Jacques

A ‘Muse’ For Holocaust Comedy

NYU student’s play takes edgy approach to life in a death camp.

10/14/2014
Staff Writer
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Jake Rosenberg, a young playwright from San Francisco whose “Holocaust comedy” set in Auschwitz makes its New York premiere next week, says his biggest bout of nerves came when the play was performed for the first time in his hometown last year.

Jake Rosenberg’s play-within-a-play, set in Auschwitz. Courtesy of Jake Rosenberg

Ghosts In The Sukkah

10/13/2014
Special To The Jewish Week
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Welcoming guests is a time-honored Jewish custom; we keep our wedding canopies open on all sides, invite others to share our Sabbath and holiday meals, and even set out a cup of wine for Elijah at our seders. On Sukkot, we extend our hospitality even to the dead, making room for our patriarchs, matriarchs, ancient leaders and kings through the joyful ritual known as ushpizin.

Scene from Jennie Romaine and Shane Baker's "The Haunted Sukke." JH Borts

For The Love Of Paris

The fate of the City of Light, and its landmarks, is at stake in ‘Diplomacy.’

10/08/2014
Special To The Jewish Week
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It is the evening of Aug. 24, 1944, and Allied troops are headed for Occupied Paris. The Wehrmacht, commanded by Gen. Dietrich von Choltitz, are IS preparing to dynamite all the bridges in the city except the Pont Neuf, and all the landmarks. All that remains is for the order to be given.

Niels Arestrup as Gen. Dietrich von Choltitz and Andre Dussollier as Consul Raoul Nordling in "Diplomacy." Jerome Prebois

Growing A Generation Of Israeli Idealists

A war hero-turned-ecologist presents a ‘living sukkah’ at the JCC in Manhattan.

10/08/2014
Special To The Jewish Week
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Avital Geva — artist, educator, activist — saw no reason to leave his kibbutz and travel to Manhattan, just to exhibit something of his life’s work. And on Sukkot yet, his favorite holiday on the kibbutz. Who needs the hopes and disappointments and ego roller-coaster of trying to make an impression in the big city? Anyone in New York who wanted to see the Ecological Greenhouse, Avital’s world-renowned educational center, was welcome to come visit in Kibbutz Ein Shemer.

A rendering of Ein Shemer Ecological Sukkah, to be constructed as part of a new exhibit at the JCC.
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