Photography

Israel, Caught In All Its Complexities

Rina Castelnuovo’s photos, at the Meislin Gallery.

05/13/2010
Staff Writer

On Tuesday, Andrea Meislin, an art dealer in New York, was on her way to Washington. Israel’s ambassador to the United States, Michael Oren, asked her to help decorate his new home, knowing that she represented some of Israel’s most prominent photographers. But Meislin, unsure of Oren’s politics and his artistic tastes, was packing light. She was bringing only her laptop for this trip, she said, which contained images of all her artwork, instead of carrying just a few select prints. She did not want to offend him with any of her own choices.

Beth Haran, West Bank ("Harvesting"), 2009.

Zooming In On South Africa

David Goldblatt’s photographs, on exhibit at The Jewish Museum,
chronicle everyday life under apartheid.

05/04/2010
Staff Writer

David Goldblatt, the South African photographer, can paint two portraits of his father, a Jewish shop-owner in a traditional mining town. In one, Goldblatt tells how his father would drink tea with a white Nationalist, a member of the right-wing party that staunchly defended apartheid, outside behind his men’s clothing store. “He was friends with some of them,” Goldblatt says of his father. “Many Jews were.”

Goldblatt's "Holdup at Hillbrow" (1963), which, like much of his work, focuses on how apartheid played out in daily life

A New Medium For Holocaust Stories

Part graphic novel, part documentary, ‘motion comics’
help attract viewers to difficult topics.

04/13/2010
Special To The Jewish Week

The creators of “They Spoke Out: American Voices Against the Holocaust,” a new series of motion comics, can each talk about why that relatively new medium is best suited for telling the stories they chose — those of Americans who helped rescue Jews in the 1930s and ‘40s.

But perhaps no explanation is more compelling than the one offered by Neal Adams, a legend in the comic-book industry and the illustrator of the new series.

New York Mayor Fiorello LaGuardia’s forceful stance against Nazi Germany is told in “LaGuardia’s War Against Hitler.”

Passover Form And Function

For Israeli photographer Galia Gur Zeev, the seder table suggests multiple meanings.

03/29/2010
Staff Writer

 A few things immediately come to mind when you think, "Passover seder": matzah, maror, charoset, four glasses of wine. But in "Seder.Table," a cool, stark and fascinating new photography exhibit at the 92nd Street Y, none of that matters. In fact, the artist, Galia Gur Zeev, while showing several plates, people around them, and a large wooden table, doesn't even show a crumb of food.

"Seder.Table": a body of work that is notably domestic yet still richly varied

Zion’s World

04/01/2008
Staff Writer
Zion Ozeri, globetrotting photographer who lives on the Upper East Side, packs a few camera bodies, several lenses and lots of film when he sets off on a working trip. But that’s not the most vital part of his job. “I have a big smile,” says Ozeri, whose pictures of Israeli families, with roots in native lands around the world, are featured in these pages. “People have to trust you. You have to convince them to allow you into their homes.”

Present At The Creation

04/01/2008
Staff Writer
The State of Israel does not have a state photographer, but if it did, he would be an 83-year-old native of Vienna. David Rubinger came to Israel in 1939 as part of the Youth Aliyah movement, received his first camera in 1945, started his photo-journalist career by shooting pictures of Jerusalemites celebrating the UN’s approval of the Partition Plan for Palestine in 1947, and never stopped shooting.

Can A Swastika Be Funny?

02/13/2008
Staff Writer
A squid giving the Nazi salute to a man who is wearing a swastika armband. A man wearing a swastika telling a like-garbed friend that their pet parrot “talks, but only if you torture him.” The serpent in the Garden of Eden telling Adam and Eve, swastikas on their arms, “You ate something that made you stupid.” From the man best known for his cartoon of a legless frog in a high-class restaurant come more cartoons, enough to fill a book, that push the boundaries of good taste or make a searing political statement, depending on your point of view.
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