Museums

Light Haunted By Darkness

Maurice Sendak handpicked menorahs from The Jewish Museum’s collection for a new show, and they reflect his life and work.

12/13/2011
Staff Writer

If you happened to have been at The Jewish Museum’s new holiday exhibit, “An Artist Remembers: Hanukkah Lamps Selected by Maurice Sendak,” last week, you would have noticed one menorah was missing. 

Thirty-three lamps are on display, all of them hand-picked by Sendak, the revered children’s book author, most famously of “Where the Wilds Things Are.” But there was an empty space under the small placard that read: “Hanukkah Lamp, Landsberg am Lech, Germany, 1945.”

Where had it gone? Why was it missing?

The missing menorah: The Jewish Museum’s menorah that was created in a post-war D.P.

Illuminating The Chanukah Context

Cervera Bible on display at Met shows the brighter side of Sephardic Jewish history.

12/07/2011
Special To The Jewish Week

The Jewish holiday of Chanukah lasts eight days, but New York’s Metropolitan Museum of Art is celebrating over the course of eight weeks, in the form of its recently opened exhibition “Lisbon’s Hebrew Bible: Medieval Jewish Art in Context,” on display through Jan. 16. And the contexts are plural, not singular.

Menorah from the Cervera Bible.

A Revolutionary Torah

Shearith Israel scroll, with burn marks still on it, is centerpiece of New-York Historical Society’s reopening exhibit.

11/15/2011
Staff Writer

In August 1776, George Washington and his troops retreated to Manhattan Island. The British had just routed his rebel army in Long Island, and Washington tried desperately to hold onto what little perch of New York he could. But by November, the British expelled his army from Manhattan, which the British occupied throughout the Revolutionary war.

The Shearith Israel Torah scroll that was burned by the invading British army, in 1776.

Photographers Taking It To The Streets

Jewish Museum’s ‘Radical Camera’ show highlights the pioneering work of the N.Y. Photo League.

11/08/2011
Special To The Jewish Week

The juxtaposition in the photograph, like the contrast between the makeshift encampment at Zuccotti Park and the soaring tower of Goldman Sachs’ headquarters, is glaring. On a gritty street on the Lower East Side, the two sides of a tenement building tell a tale of haves and have-nots, the 1 percent and the 99. In Erika Stone’s striking black-and-white photo, a family’s gray underthings hang limply on a clothesline, framed by the tenement’s fading brick, while on the adjoining wall a well-coiffed and full-lipped blonde in an advertisement gazes sexily upward, a boxy ring on her finger and a sleek watch on her wrist.

Soul of the city: Bernard Cole’s “Shoemaker’s Lunch,” from 1944. ©Estate of Bernard Cole

The Dead Sea Scrolls, With Access For All

Israel Museum-Google digitization project a boon for public but perhaps not for scholars.

10/11/2011
Staff Writer

When Google and the Israel Museum announced three weeks ago that they were digitizing images of the Dead Sea Scrolls — perhaps the most important biblical discovery of the last century — the praise was nearly ubiquitous.

People involved with the Google digitization project say it is only the beginning of a larger goal.

Strip Tease

YU Museum’s ‘Graphic Details’ exhibit spotlights feminist and edgy Jewish comics.

10/04/2011
Special To The Jewish Week

Yeshiva University Museum has upped its cool — and its feminist — factor with a new exhibition showcasing comic art by Jewish women artists.

“Graphic Details: Confessional Comics by Jewish Women,” which opened last week, presents work by 18 artists from the U.S., Canada, England and Israel from the 1970s to the present.

Miriam Katin’s “Eucalyptus Nights” and Diane Noomin’s “Baby Talk” are included in the “Graphic Details” show.

Prescription For Genocide

The ‘Deadly Medicine’ exhibit shows how politics and broader cultural currents perverted medicine.

10/04/2011
Staff Writer

To the extent that people know about Josef Mengele, the German doctor dubbed the “Angel of Death” for his grisly experiments on inmates at Auschwitz, he is usually taken to be an aberration. Surely, many assume, there was a silent majority of German doctors, who, if not bold enough to speak out against the ghastly turn medicine had taken under the Nazi regime, were against the race-based science the Nazis preached.

Students at the Berlin School for the Blind examine racial head models circa 1935.

Drawing A Bead On Ezra Jack Keats

The children’s book author-illustrator broke ground with an African-American character in ‘The Snowy Day,’ but his Jewish identity isn’t black and white.

09/13/2011
Staff Writer

The publication of “The Snowy Day” in 1962 was a seminal moment in publishing history. Never before had a mainstream publisher put out a children’s book that focused on an African-American character, and never before had anyone thought that such a book could win a Caldecott Medal, one of the industry’s most prestigious prizes.

Keats’ “The Snowy Day,” was the first book published by a major publishing house to feature an African-American protagonist.

Memories Of Home, In 3D

Maya Zack recreates a 1930s Berlin living room, complete with portents of doom.

08/02/2011
Staff Writer

Maya Zack wanted to get every detail right.

She pestered a German Jewish refugee, Manfred Nomburg, about every last detail of the Berlin home where he grew up: the wallpaper, the dining room china, the living room chairs. He had not seen his home in 70 years, when he escaped to Pre-state Israel.

But when Zack, 35, a prize-winning Israeli artist, turned all those details into a life-sized, computer-generated 3D work of art — titled “Living Room,” which goes on view at The Jewish Museum on Sunday — Nomburg did not recognize a thing.

Maya Zack

Memories Of Home, In 3D

Maya Zack recreates a 1930s Berlin living room, complete with portents of doom.

07/27/2011
Staff Writer

Maya Zack wanted to get every detail right.

She pestered a German Jewish refugee, Manfred Nomburg, about every last detail of the Berlin home where he grew up: the wallpaper, the dining room china, the living room chairs. He had not seen his home in 70 years, when he escaped to Israel.

Detail of Maya Zack’s “Living Room” (2009). Courtesy of the artist and the Alon Segev Gallery, Tel Aviv
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