Theater

The Heart Of The Shoah

Staging Hanna Krall’s ‘Chasing the King of Hearts.’

11/19/2014
Special To The Jewish Week
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Unsung, for the most part, in this country, Hanna Krall is a literary titan in Europe, where her stories are renowned for their fairy tale-like evocation both of the Shoah and of prewar Jewish life in her native Poland. Now comes “The King of Hearts is Off Again,” a Polish stage adaptation of her 2007 bestselling novel, “Chasing the King of Hearts,” which opens next week in the East Village. When it ran in 2012 in Los Angeles, critic Steven Leigh Morris of the L.A. Weekly called it “thrilling physical theater.”

Magda Czarny, and Danny Kearns in “The King of Hearts is Off Again.”  Photos by Paweł Wilewski

What Lurks Beneath

A powerful but flawed ‘Disgraced’ touches on Muslim rage, Jewish success and being a minority in America

11/11/2014
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Rude awakenings are the raw material of drama. Ever since the unfortunate King Oedipus, characters have been jolted to realize that their self-image is colossally, and, ultimately, catastrophically different from the ways in which others have perceived them.

Hari Dhillon, second from left, as the Muslim-American Amir, with Gretchen Mol, Karen Pittman and Josh Radnor. Joan Marcus

‘Fortress Of Solitude,’ The Musical

11/11/2014
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Music runs like a river through Jonathan Lethem’s best-selling 2003 novel, “The Fortress of Solitude,” set in Boerum Hill, Brooklyn, in the late 1970s and early 1980s. The work centers on the unlikely friendship between two boys, one Jewish and the other African American, as both navigate a world being turned upside down by drugs and economic inequality,

Adam Chanler-Berat in “Fortress of Solitude,” based on Jonathan Lethem’s novel.  Joan Marcus

The Sound Of (Electronic) Music

11/04/2014
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His name may not ring a bell, but his music became part of the soundtrack of American pop culture. Raymond Scott was a bandleader, pianist, composer and inventor of electronic instruments whose zany melodies were used in more than 100 animated shorts. In the new play, “Powerhouse,” Scott comes roaring back to life. When “Powerhouse” premiered at the Fringe Festival five years ago, Jason Zinoman of The New York Times called it “one steam train of a drama … the rare Fringe show that lives up to its title.” A revised version opened last weekend in the West Village.

Scene from “Powerhouse,” about electronic music pioneer Raymond Scott.  Josh Luxenberg

Double Vision On Israel

Zvi Sahar’s ‘Salt of the Earth’ features puppetry set against shifting pillars of salt.

10/28/2014
Culture Editor
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The puppet at the center of Zvi Sahar’s “Salt of the Earth” is made out of an Israeli combat bag from the 1967 war. Sahar thought that he might make the figure out of stone or olive wood, but when he saw the bag at a Jaffa flea market, he liked it immediately.

Ships: Jim R. Moore

Shulamit’s Song

10/28/2014
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From Neil Diamond’s 1969 gospel-infused tune, “Holly Holy,” to this past summer’s “Song of Solomon: The Musical” by Andrew Beall and Neil van Leeuwen, the Song of Songs from the Hebrew Bible has inspired American songwriters for generations. Now comes pianist Dina Pruzhansky’s chamber opera, “Shulamit,” which centers on the bold and beautiful lover taken by King Solomon. The work, which premieres this weekend at the JCC Manhattan, will be sung in Hebrew with English supertitles.

Pianist Dina Pruzhansky’s chamber opera, “Shulamit,” is based on the biblical Song of Songs. Rusiko Mchedlishvili

Caught In History’s Maelstrom

10/21/2014
Special To The Jewish Week
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Mass migrations and persecutions can be difficult for us to comprehend, since they involve so many people and so many overlapping historical trajectories. Actress Pippa White finds a way into these wrenching social and political shifts through a laser- sharp focus on individuals caught up in the maelstrom of history. In two one-woman shows, “Voices from the Resistance” and “Voices from Ellis Island,” White brings to life the true stories of those daring men and women who risked their lives for freedom. Each show runs next week for one performance only at the United Solo Festival in Midtown.

Actress Pippa White performs roles of women resisting the Nazis, and coming to the U.S., in show at Theatre Row.

Islam And Judaism On This Dinner Menu

Ayad Akhtar’s Pulitzer-winning ‘Disgraced’ asks broad questions about the interplay between the two faiths.

10/14/2014
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‘Islam comes from the desert,” says the character Amir over dinner at his lavish Manhattan apartment. “From a group of tough- minded, tough-living people who saw life as something … to be suffered. Jews reacted to the situation differently. They turned it over and over and over. I mean look at the Talmud. They’re looking at things from a hundred different angles. … Muslims don’t think about it. They submit.”

The cast of “Disgraced.”  Andrew Eccles

The Long Wait

10/14/2014
Special To The Jewish Week
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Fed up with decades of slaving away at Lindy’s, waiters at that iconic Jewish eatery used to joke about writing a tell-all memoir, “I’ve Waited Long Enough.” Brad Zimmerman knows the feeling. After 29 years of waiting tables as an unemployed actor, he finally has his own one-man stand-up show, “My Son the Waiter: A Jewish Tragedy,” in which he chronicles his agonizing odyssey to the stage. When it ran in June in Southern California, critic Pam Kragen of the San Diego Union-Tribune called the show “witty and deeply personal … part confessional, part therapy session and part black comedy.” It opens this Sunday on the Upper West Side.

Brad Zimmerman in his one-man show,  “My Son, the Waiter: A Jewish Tragedy.”  Ken Jacques

A ‘Muse’ For Holocaust Comedy

NYU student’s play takes edgy approach to life in a death camp.

10/14/2014
Staff Writer
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Jake Rosenberg, a young playwright from San Francisco whose “Holocaust comedy” set in Auschwitz makes its New York premiere next week, says his biggest bout of nerves came when the play was performed for the first time in his hometown last year.

Jake Rosenberg’s play-within-a-play, set in Auschwitz. Courtesy of Jake Rosenberg
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