Film

Outcasts Of The Resistance

08/17/2010

 Regionally based filmmaking is a relatively new trend in France, with a very few notable exceptions. Prominent among them is Marseille’s Robert Guediguian. Guediguian is an old hand whose newest film, opening this week, is “Army of Crime,” the 16th feature in a directorial career that began almost 30 years ago.

Being The Safdie Brothers

The life and ‘manic cinema’ of the buzz-generating filmmaking duo.

08/17/2010
Special To The Jewish Week

What makes a filmmaker’s work Jewish?

Benny Safdie, at 24 the younger half of a filmmaking duo with his brother Josh, earnestly asserts that the Jewishness of the two pervades their work, and this critic tends to agree with him. That work is the subject of a current program at BAMCinemathek that includes not only their two features and many shorts but also films that influenced them.

Safdie also readily admits that he’d be hard put to identify Jewishy specifics from their small but significant output.

Brother act: Josh, left, and Benny Safdie.

New Holocaust Film: Recycling History

Long avoiding Shoah films because of her personal connection, Yael Hersonki was compelled to analyze ghetto images used by Nazis in “A Film Unfinished.”

08/10/2010
Special to the Jewish Week

It’s a rather odd admission for a director whose first feature film is a ground-breaking documentary about the Holocaust, but growing up in Israel, Yael Hersonski avoided films about the Shoah and memorial sites like Yad Vashem. She had a much more vivid reminder of the events at home.

Israeli filmmaker Yael Hersonki used footage from unfinished Nazi propaganda to show life in the Warsaw Ghetto.

Mississippi’s Burning Questions

In “Neshoba,” Micki Dickoff paints a vivid picture of the 1964 murders of three civil rights workers, and justice still unserved.

08/10/2010
Special to the Jewish Week

In 1964 when she was only 17, Micki Dickoff asked her father if she could go to Mississippi to work with the volunteers  of  Freedom Summer, registering black voters. Her father, a Mississippi native, refused to allow her to go. His was the only Jewish family in a small Mississippi town, and he feared what she would find there. Not long after, his worst fears were confirmed when three of the volunteers, James Chaney, Andrew Goodman and Michael Schwerner, were murdered by local Klansmen, all of them deputy sheriffs of Neshoba County. 

After 50 years, Edward Ray Killen, a former KKK member, remains unrepentant for his role in the murder of three young activists,

Hate-Group Members In Love

Danish film ‘Brotherhood’ explores an unlikely romance between gay neo-Nazis.

08/04/2010
Special To The Jewish Week

 There have been many films that explore the pathology and sociology of fascist movements. It’s a subject perhaps better suited to documentary than to fiction simply because the issues are a bit too complex, the strands of race, ethnicity, class and “tribal” allegiance too densely interwoven for dramatization within the allotted time of a conventional feature film.

Danish film ‘Brotherhood’

Samuel Maoz’s 20 Years’ War

As ‘Lebanon’ opens theatrically, the director reflects on his war experience and what it took to turn it into a film.

08/03/2010
Special To The Jewish Week

Samuel Maoz was only 20 years old when the first Lebanon War broke out. He was a gunner in a tank crew and at 6:15 a.m. on the morning of June 6, 1982, he killed a man for the first time in his life.

“It was a release to make the film,” Maoz says.

Holocaust Survivor’s Debt Of Thanks

Documentary focuses on reunion between German native and pioneering doctor.

07/28/2010
Staff Writer

A child survivor of the Holocaust, Inge Auerbacher developed tuberculosis in Terezin and was “at death’s door” with the disease shortly after she immigrated to the United States in 1946. Only treatment with streptomycin, a drug developed three years earlier and still in its experimental stage, saved her life.

Chaplin’s Splendid Audacity

The daring of ‘The Great Dictator’ and how it speaks to us through the years.

07/27/2010
Special To The Jewish Week

I believe it was William L. Shirer who said that if someone had pulled down Adolf Hitler’s pants in public in 1923 he never would have become Reichschancellor. Ridicule, in the right hands, is a powerful weapon. That was probably what was going through Charles Chaplin’s mind when he began work on “The Great Dictator” in 1938. 

Chaplin as Adenoid Hynkel: Taking on Hitler was an act of cinematic boldness.

‘I’m Always Hiding Behind My Stories’

Radu Mihaileanu’s cinema of deception and identity.

07/20/2010
Staff Writer

For the first years of his life in communist Romania, Radu Mihaileanu couldn’t understand why his grandmother, who lived with his family, prepared her own meals in her own pots and pans.

Radu Mihaileanu’s latest film carries a familiar theme, of hidden identity and yearning for freedom. Getty Images Weinstein comp

A Holocaust Documentary With A Difference

Intelligently structured, ‘Street Of Our Lady’ is a tribute to a Polish mother and daughter who saved 15 Jews

06/30/2010
Special To The Jewish Week

When the Second World War broke out, the town of Sokal, then in Poland, had a population that included 6,000 Jews. By 1944, only 30 were still alive. Fifteen of them were being hidden in an attic and a hayloft over a pigsty by Francisca Halamajowa and her daughter Helena.

Chaim Maltz reflects at the Sokal train station
Syndicate content