Film

Oy Romeo, Romeo!

Yiddish comedy-drama casts alienated chasidic youth as the ill-fated Shakespearean lovers.

07/06/2011
Special To The Jewish Week

In its own daffy way, “Romeo and Juliet in Yiddish” is as much a documentary as it is a comedy-drama. The film’s cast consists of alienated chasidic youth re-enacting their own pasts as runaways, scam artists and street kids. The film’s writer-director, Eve Annenberg, plays a nurse, which is what she is in her day job, who becomes involved in the lives of these kids when, as part of her graduate work outside the medical world, she is commissioned to create a modernized Yiddish-language version of the venerable Shakespeare romantic tragedy.

Lazar Weiss and Melissa "Malky" Weisz in "Romeo and Juliet in Yiddish."

Sholem Aleichem And Modern Jewish Identity

‘Arguing the World’ director Joseph Dorman turns his lens on the great Yiddish writer.

07/05/2011
Special To The Jewish Week

Joseph Dorman has a confession to make.

“I love compulsive talkers,” he says, laughing. “I’m very interested in talk.”

Seeking Justice For Deborah

Jewish filmmaker and Jewish lawyer take on the case of an abused woman unfairly imprisoned in California.

06/28/2011
Special To The Jewish Week

We pray the words every day, but they probably don’t register: “matir asurim,” who frees the captive. Perhaps they are too familiar, our recitation too rote. But the commandment, like the instruction to seek justice, is one of the essentials of Jewish thought and life.

Joshua Safran, left and Nadia Costa, right, meet with Peagler to take up her cause.

A French Jewish-Muslim Romance

Satisfying and poignant, ‘The Names of Love’ rises above the constraints of its genre.

06/21/2011
Special To The Jewish Week

The original French title of the new comedy “The Names of Love,” which opens on June 24, was “Le Nom des Gens.” That loosely translates as “the name of people” and, for a film that is very much about the nature of identity and self-definition, it is a more apt title. On the other hand, since the film is a sweet-natured romantic comedy, maybe things are best left as they are.

Director Michel Leclerc, top right, showcases the love story of Baya and Arthur.

A ‘Righteous’ Lens: Genocides Then And Now

06/14/2011
Staff Writer

During his senior year at the University of Pennsylvania, Samuel Goldberg, an Upper West Side native, day school graduate and English/filmmaking major in college, was weighing a career in philanthropy or entertainment.

Then he saw “The Last Survivor.”

Samuel Goldberg, second from right, with the Righteous Pictures team.

The Cauldron That Is Hebron

New documentary looks at IDF’s thankless job as buffer between settlers and Palestinians.

06/14/2011
Special To The Jewish Week

The first images one sees in the new documentary “This Is My Land ... Hebron” are seemingly familiar ones, young men wearing balaclavas and throwing rocks at Israeli soldiers. It is only as the scene continues that one realizes that these young men are also wearing tzitzit and shouting in Hebrew and English. Welcome to Hebron.

Middle men: Scenes from “This Is My Land … Hebron,” with IDF soldiers trying to keep the peace.

‘Bride Flight’ Rocked By Turbulence

With too many competing storylines, film is weighed down by excess baggage

06/07/2011
Special to the Jewish Week

 Art is here: http://www.musicboxfilms.com/bride-flight#stills

Marjorie (Elise Schaap) and Hans (Mattijn Hartemink) in "Bride Flight."

North Shore Gets A Film Festival

Inaugural Gold Coast fest plays to local demographic.

05/25/2011
Special To The Jewish Week

The obvious question is, “Does the New York area really need another film festival?”

The not-so-obvious answer, given by Regina Gil, the founder of the Gold Coast International Film Festival, which opens its inaugural event on June 1, is an emphatic affirmative.

“Infiltration,” top, and “Naomi” are two Israeli films that will screen at the first Gold Coast International Film Festival.

The Rabbi Was A ‘Freedom Rider’

N.J. spiritual leader, part of a new PBS documentary, looks back on his role in the civil rights struggle.

05/11/2011
Staff Writer

When Rabbi Israel S. Dresner got a call 50 years ago asking if he’d be willing to go on a Freedom Ride aimed at desegregating bus stations in the South, he did not hesitate.

“Remember, I’m a guy who grew up in the 1930s when Hitler was on the rise,” Rabbi Dresner, now 82, said in a recent interview from his home in Wayne, N.J. “How can I not be against racism?”

Rabbi Israel S. Dresner

Life-Saving Amid Bloodshed

Award-winning film about a Gaza boy and his Israeli doctor wins fans from all sides of the conflict.

05/10/2011
Staff Writer

In 2008, Shlomi Eldar, a prominent Israeli television journalist, was asked to do a segment on a baby Palestinian boy suffering from a lethal blood disease, and an Israeli doctor’s attempt to save him. But Eldar was reluctant.

Raida, right, with her 4-month-old son Mohammad, middle, in a scene from “Precious Life,” which airs on HBO this month.
Syndicate content