Use Case

TEST6 - Finding Common Ground In A City Of Differences

Tel Aviv native Rabbi Aryeh Stern was elected the capital’s Ashkenazi chief rabbi last October

07/11/2015
Staff Writer

Rabbi Aryeh Stern, a native of Tel Aviv who has served since 1982 on the staff of Jerusalem’s Mercaz Harav yeshiva, a leading religious Zionist institution, was elected the capital’s Ashkenazi chief rabbi last October. For political and bureaucratic reasons, the city’s two chief rabbi posts, chosen by religious and political figures, had not been filled for almost a dozen years. The rabbi, 70, who, unlike many charedi Israelis, has served in the Israeli Army in two wars, and his children and grandchildren have also done Army service. The Jewish Week interviewed him during a recent visit he made to New York for a Rabbinical Council of America conference. This is an edited transcript.

TEST5 - Finding Common Ground In A City Of Differences

Tel Aviv native Rabbi Aryeh Stern was elected the capital’s Ashkenazi chief rabbi last October

07/11/2015
Staff Writer

Rabbi Aryeh Stern, a native of Tel Aviv who has served since 1982 on the staff of Jerusalem’s Mercaz Harav yeshiva, a leading religious Zionist institution, was elected the capital’s Ashkenazi chief rabbi last October. For political and bureaucratic reasons, the city’s two chief rabbi posts, chosen by religious and political figures, had not been filled for almost a dozen years. The rabbi, 70, who, unlike many charedi Israelis, has served in the Israeli Army in two wars, and his children and grandchildren have also done Army service. The Jewish Week interviewed him during a recent visit he made to New York for a Rabbinical Council of America conference. This is an edited transcript.

TEST4 - Finding Common Ground In A City Of Differences

Tel Aviv native Rabbi Aryeh Stern was elected the capital’s Ashkenazi chief rabbi last October

07/11/2015
Staff Writer

Rabbi Aryeh Stern, a native of Tel Aviv who has served since 1982 on the staff of Jerusalem’s Mercaz Harav yeshiva, a leading religious Zionist institution, was elected the capital’s Ashkenazi chief rabbi last October. For political and bureaucratic reasons, the city’s two chief rabbi posts, chosen by religious and political figures, had not been filled for almost a dozen years. The rabbi, 70, who, unlike many charedi Israelis, has served in the Israeli Army in two wars, and his children and grandchildren have also done Army service. The Jewish Week interviewed him during a recent visit he made to New York for a Rabbinical Council of America conference. This is an edited transcript.

TEST3 - Finding Common Ground In A City Of Differences

Tel Aviv native Rabbi Aryeh Stern was elected the capital’s Ashkenazi chief rabbi last October

07/11/2015
Staff Writer

Rabbi Aryeh Stern, a native of Tel Aviv who has served since 1982 on the staff of Jerusalem’s Mercaz Harav yeshiva, a leading religious Zionist institution, was elected the capital’s Ashkenazi chief rabbi last October. For political and bureaucratic reasons, the city’s two chief rabbi posts, chosen by religious and political figures, had not been filled for almost a dozen years. The rabbi, 70, who, unlike many charedi Israelis, has served in the Israeli Army in two wars, and his children and grandchildren have also done Army service. The Jewish Week interviewed him during a recent visit he made to New York for a Rabbinical Council of America conference. This is an edited transcript.

TEST1 - Finding Common Ground In A City Of Differences

Tel Aviv native Rabbi Aryeh Stern was elected the capital’s Ashkenazi chief rabbi last October

07/11/2015

Rabbi Aryeh Stern, a native of Tel Aviv who has served since 1982 on the staff of Jerusalem’s Mercaz Harav yeshiva, a leading religious Zionist institution, was elected the capital’s Ashkenazi chief rabbi last October. For political and bureaucratic reasons, the city’s two chief rabbi posts, chosen by religious and political figures, had not been filled for almost a dozen years. The rabbi, 70, who, unlike many charedi Israelis, has served in the Israeli Army in two wars, and his children and grandchildren have also done Army service. The Jewish Week interviewed him during a recent visit he made to New York for a Rabbinical Council of America conference. This is an edited transcript.

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TEST - Michael Oren And The Debate That Won’t Die

The former ambassador brought criticism on himself by writing provocative opinion pieces when his book was published.

07/10/2015
Editor and Publisher

Michael Oren, the highly respected historian and former Israeli ambassador to the U.S., has become the latest lightning rod in the bitter struggle among those who profess to know what’s best for Israel. And like the Jewish state he served as diplomat, and now as Knesset member, Oren has gone from chief unifier to deep divider for many American Jews.

TEST2 - Michael Oren And The Debate That Won’t Die

The former ambassador brought criticism on himself by writing provocative opinion pieces when his book was published.

07/10/2015
Editor and Publisher

Michael Oren, the highly respected historian and former Israeli ambassador to the U.S., has become the latest lightning rod in the bitter struggle among those who profess to know what’s best for Israel. And like the Jewish state he served as diplomat, and now as Knesset member, Oren has gone from chief unifier to deep divider for many American Jews.

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