The Good Book

Cookbook reviews.

Cooking For Michael Pollan

An intrepid chef sets out to prepare dinner for the "God of Healthy Food."

07/16/2013
Special To The Jewish Week
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Driving through the California farmland near my home, I was listening closely to an interview on National Public Radio with Michael Pollan. He’s a hero in these parts, and I was really surprised to hear him say that he’s had to eat restaurant food while on tour for his new book, “Cooked: A Natural History of Transformation.”

Michael Pollan. Photo credit: Alia Malley

'Schmaltzy' In Austin

At a quirky Texas food truck, the only meat is in the name.

06/28/2013
Special To The Jewish Week
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Tucked behind a bookstore on the grungier east side of Austin, Texas is the only Jewish-style food truck in a city known for its robust street food scene. Named "Schmaltz," which means both chicken fat and overly sentimental, the trailer paradoxically offers vegetarian food, such as falafel, kombucha and a vegan Reuben.

All the menu items are named after Jewish writers and artists. Amy Kritzer

Happy 125th!

At birthday dinner, famous chefs put a new spin on Katz's classics.

06/03/2013
Food & Wine Editor
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It’s moments like last Friday night at Katz’s Delicatessen that validate my reasons for moving to New York.  

I’ve always been fascinated by American history and one of the things I appreciate most about New York, having moved here almost two years ago from the California Bay Area, is its age. When I came to Katz’s Shabbat dinner to celebrate its 125th anniversary, I couldn’t help but admire the deli’s ability to maintain its old-fashioned charm in the middle of this modern metropolis.

The deli’s enduring legacy comes from its ability to adapt to change while also maintaining its traditions. Each of the four courses at the Friday night feast reflected this balance of old and new.

Katz's strikes a balance between old and new. Richard Koek
Photo Galleria
Photo Galleria: 
"Chicken-in-a-pot." Photo courtesy Richard Koek
Kung Pao Pastrami. Photo courtesy Richard Koek
Sarabeth's lemony cheesecakes. Photo courtesy Richard Koek

L'Chaim & Slainte

The earthy, herby Talisker 25 compels description.

05/23/2013
Special To The Jewish Week

One of us recently had an addition to the family, and as Judaism is both a family- centered and a belief-centered religion, a simcha, or happiness, for one Jew is a celebration for all of the Nation of Israel. So in this case – the birth and naming of Miriam Chaya Tzivia London – everyone gathered had reason to rejoice.

You won't be able to resist drinking this, or talking about it. Photo courtesy Josh London

The Whole Enchilada

In Jewish L.A., authentic Mexican that's rigorously kosher.

04/24/2013
Special for the Jewish Week

On a recent trip to SoCal to visit a client, I stopped off in the heart of Jewish Los Angeles (Pico-Robertson Boulevard, of course) to check out Mexikosher, a kosher Mexican restaurant that that tastes like the real deal in Mexican cooking.
What makes this place different, and so much better, than kosher “Mexican” restaurants I’ve eaten at in New York is that this isn’t fast food.

Mexikosher restaurant is in the heart of Jewish LA. Dani Klein

Raising The Chocolate Bar

Rabbi Deborah Prinz talks about her book, "On the Chocolate Trail," and the little-known history of Jews and chocolate.

03/22/2013
Food & Wine Editor

What do Jews and chocolate have in common? According to Rabbi Deborah Prinz, author of On the Chocolate Trail, more than you’d expect. Prinz’s book takes you on her worldwide expedition on the chocolate trail, exploring the historical legacy of chocolate and religion. Included in the book are recipes, a consumer’s guide to buying ethically produced chocolate and a list of chocolate museums and tours around the world. I spoke with Rabbi Prinz about her favorite chocolate Passover recipes, the most bizarre chocolate combination she’s tried and what’s next for her journey on the chocolate trail.  

Rabbi Debbie Prinz, author of On the Chocolate Trail

A New Take On Kosher At Citron And Rose

Philly has more than just cheese-stake to offer Jewish foodies.

03/07/2013
Food & Wine Contributor

Merion, Pa. — My grandmother of blessed memory would be surprised if she knew what they’re doing with the schmaltz here at Citron and Rose, a stylish, new glatt kosher restaurant next door to the Philadelphia Community Kollel in this upscale Philly suburb.
They mix it with fried garlic and onions as a substitute for butter with the warm dinner rolls.

This is where kosher cuisine meets a sometimes-surprising re-interpretation, thanks to some very creative individuals.

Kosher dining is chic and sleek at Citron and Rose. George Medovoy
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