Editorial & Opinion

Business Ethics

11/29/2011

 

In this age of deception and fraud, it is worthwhile to remember the unequivocal voice of the Jewish tradition. As Maimonides rules: “It is forbidden to mislead people in business or to deceive them. This is equally true whether it involves gentiles or Jews. Thus when one knows that there is a defect in one’s merchandise, one must so inform the purchaser. And it is even forbidden to deceive people in words only” (M.T. Hil. Mekhira 18).

Mind The Gap Between Orthodox And Other Jews

11/29/2011
Editor And Publisher

When journalist Peter Beinart talks about the growing alienation between young American Jews and Israel, and with their Jewish practice, he is quick to point out that he isn’t referring to the Orthodox.

Indeed, young Orthodox Jews, reflecting their elders’ behavior, are the exception to his rule, deeply committed to their religion and the Jewish state.

Gary Rosenblatt

Airbrushing History

11/29/2011

I must respond to the assertion that Pope Pius XII did what he could to save European Jewry (Letters, Nov. 25). This is an attempt to airbrush history.

The fact is that the Catholic Church was the one institution that could have prevented the mass deportation and extermination of European Jewry. It is admitted that some national churches, i.e. the Church in Holland did what they could to protest deportation.

Up To The Community

11/29/2011

Your editorial, “Celebrating Women’s Advances,” (Nov. 22), correctly extols the accomplishments of the Jewish Orthodox Feminist Alliance in all areas, except for their inability to persuade the Orthodox rabbinate to apply existing halachic principles that would allow for a systemic solution to the agunah problem, the most egregious plight facing Orthodoxy today.

You state, “Perhaps if the rabbis thought of their daughters in that unfortunate place of the agunah, they would be spurred to act.”

Questions For Mormons

11/29/2011

Gary Rosenblatt’s column (“Romney Or Not, We Can Learn From The Mormons,” Nov. 25) offering a Jewish perspective on Mitt Romney’s candidacy in next year’s presidential election is eminently timely, but begs for attention to some serious issues concerning Mormonism’s possible impingement on the candidate’s suitability for the highest political office.

Here are three questions among others that warrant consideration:

Not Just For Republicans

11/29/2011

In Gary Rosenblatt’s column, “Romney Or Not, We Can Learn From The Mormons” (Nov. 25), I was puzzled by his comment that Mitt Romney is an attractive candidate for “Jewish Republicans.” 

Why limit Romney’s Jewish appeal to Republicans? Especially when the current occupant of the White House has been so hostile to Israel and other Jewish interests.

This coming election will prove (again, after Bob Turner’s victory) that the Democrats do not have the lock on the Jewish vote that they once did.

Kosher Consumers

11/29/2011

Reading “Kosher Butchers Cutting Closer To The Bone” (Oct. 28) one would mistakenly conclude that only stores outside the kosher community offer savings.

My family has been in the kosher food business for half a century and offering, from day one, the best possible value. My father, Sam Brach, of blessed memory, considered making kosher food affordable his life’s mission.

We, the stores in the kosher community, take very seriously the responsibility to serve our people. We stock the full line of most of the brands we carry.

‘Buy Israel’ Misleading

11/29/2011

The Jewish Week’s call to “buy Israel” in the framework of “Buy Israel Week” (Editorial, Nov.11) is well intentioned, but misleading. Specifically, the “Buy Israel Week” campaign makes absolutely no distinction between Israel and Israeli settlements in the West Bank. As a result, “Buy Israel Week” would have us buy from Tekoa, the settlement home of Foreign Minister Avigdor Lieberman, as quickly as we would buy from Tel Aviv.

Special Attention To Special Needs

11/29/2011
Editorial

Sometimes it can seem, or we’d like to think, that the Jewish community is a Lake Wobegon of sorts, where “all the women are strong, all the men are good looking, and all the children are above average.” Of course, we know that so many of us are hardly that, and too many of our children, despite all our love and prayers, are special or unique in ways that can be more difficult, and more demanding of parents. Ideally, the community would respond to those with special needs.

Troubling Legislation In The Knesset

11/29/2011
Editorial

Rabbi Eric Yoffie, who will be completing his 16-year tenure as head of the Reform movement at the end of the year, has never been afraid to speak his mind. He has been an advocate for greater Torah study and observance of Jewish ritual within the Union of Reform Judaism, taken President Barack Obama to task for publicizing his disagreement with Israel over settlements, called on a major Muslim American group to engage in more dialogue with Jews, and chided J Street members, at their annual convention, about some of their criticisms of Israel.

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