Editorial & Opinion

JCCs Key To Building Community

07/11/2012

As Gary Rosenblatt noted, the recently released UJA-Federation of New York population study documents the continued diversification of the Jewish people and underscores the importance of doing more to build community (“A Community Falling Apart?” June 15).

Rosenblatt asks how UJA-Federation can respond and build community. I believe an important component of that response has to involve an increased and intensified investment in Jewish community centers by UJA-Federation, Jewish foundations, individual donors and lay leaders.

New Israel Fund Statements

07/11/2012

Whether the New Israel Fund is “anti-Israel” or not is a matter of opinion; whether it is “in favor of the Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions movement against Israel” is a matter of fact.

IPF Not ‘Centrist’

07/11/2012

Your interview with the chairman of the resurrected Israel Policy Forum adopts his self-description of IPF as “centrist” (“IPF Back In Fray,” June 22). That organization is anything but. Adopting a self-description can be highly inaccurate. For example, the fact that another group that lobbies Congress against Israeli positions calls itself “pro-Israel” hardly makes that label true.

Court Of Public Opinion

07/11/2012
Editorial

Two surprising legal rulings out of Jerusalem this week underscore the complex mix of, and distinctions between, law and politics in Israel.

After a two-year trial, former Prime Minister Ehud Olmert was acquitted of the main charges of fraud, tax evasion, breach of trust and falsifying records.

The Russian Evolution

07/11/2012
Editorial

The Russian-speaking Jewish population of New York has come of age, not only making up about 20 percent of the overall Jewish community, but also becoming increasingly active in cultural, political and social ways that make its Jewish identity distinctive.

While others may measure Jewish commitment in religious terms, this tightly-knit community is known for its strong support of Israel, conservative politics, and drive for educational and economic success.

Needed: A National Strategy For Including Jews With Special Needs

07/11/2012
Special To The Jewish Week

At a recent seminar for nonprofit leaders, I heard one who oversees some 40 Catholic schools in Australia tell of a boy with Tourette Syndrome who, in the midst of a school assembly, stood up and screamed a string of obscenities. When the child finished, the school’s director rose to address the students. “We have just heard from Johnny,” he said gently, “and he is a valued member of our community.” Not a single child chuckled or made the boy feel anything other than welcomed. Full inclusion.

Jennifer Laszlo Mizrahi 


The Complex Dance Of Choosing A New Rabbi

07/11/2012
Special To The Jewish Week

My friend Raphael Silver recently completed a novel, “Congregation,” that will be published as an e-book later this year. It centers on a strong, charismatic rabbi of a large Reform congregation in Cleveland, who is diagnosed with ALS and must decide when to retire. Various sub-plots intertwine, one of them about the manipulations of the congregation’s president to have the assistant rabbi replace the senior one when he leaves.

Francine Klagsbrun

The First Shlemiel: What’s In A Name?

07/11/2012
Special To The Jewish Week

Candlelighting, Readings:
Shabbat candles: 8:09 p.m.
Torah: Numbers 25:10-30:1
Haphtara: I Kings 18:46-19:21
Havdalah: 9:12 p.m. 

Rabbi Zev Brenner

What Does Bibi Want?

07/11/2012
Editor and Publisher

Israelis call him by his affectionate nickname, Bibi, but few speak of him with warmth.

There is no alternative political leader on the horizon, but that doesn’t mean he’s popular at home.

Even though he is not known for his integrity, he is widely trusted with protecting the fate of his people as Israel faces the threat of extinction from a nuclear Iran.

Gary Rosenblatt

Why ‘Jewish Community’ Is Harder To Define, And Serve

07/03/2012
Editor And Publisher

Only about 2 percent of the respondents to the New York Jewish Population Study are “Jewish by conversion.” Twice as many people — 5 percent of the study — describe themselves as “Jewish by personal choice.”

Gary Rosenblatt
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