Editorial & Opinion

If You Build It, It May Fall

Each sukkah must strike a delicate balance between material protection and the need for God’s shelter.

10/08/2014
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When it comes to hardware stores, count me as a One-Day-A-Year Jew — and that day is comes around just before the holiday of Sukkot, when over the years I would struggle to put up our family sukkah in the backyard. Thank God it only has to stand for eight days.

Gary Rosenblatt

Sukkot, A Festival For Inclusion

10/08/2014
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The Days of Awe may climax on Yom Kippur, but the evening shofar inaugurates a spirited and spiritual Oktoberfest unparalleled in the Jewish year. Immediately after breaking the fast, many started constructing sukkot, not only in backyards but also shoehorned with urban ingenuity into New York alleys and apartment terraces. We’re told that the days leading up to Sukkot are a time when Jewish people are preoccupied with mitzvot, preparing the sukkah, cooking meals, inviting guests, children scissoring and stringing decorations, buying lulavim and etrogim, and then the sweet peace of the holiday itself.

Yom Kippur As Renewal

10/08/2014
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On the eve of the Yom Kippur, the holiest day of the Jewish year, we reflect on the power of the day and the opportunity for atonement.

Secrets Of The Holy Day

10/01/2014
Special To The Jewish Week
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“And Aaron is to come to the Tent of Meeting and remove the linen garments that he had put on before entering the Sanctuary, and he is to leave them there” [Leviticus 16:23].

Not only were these vestments removed, but the clothing that the Kohen Gadol (High Priest) wore when he achieved complete forgiveness for the Jewish People had to be buried. Those clothes were never to be worn again, not by him and not by anyone else. 

Rabbi Neal Fleischmann

For Israel, A Difficult Season Of Reckoning

10/01/2014
Special To The Jewish Week
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The season of reckoning is upon us. This is the time of the High Holy Days, when we are called upon to go into introspection mode and identify particular sins of commission or omission. Jewish tradition calls upon us to repent and to make amends.

Rabbi Sid Schwarz

My Feminist Struggles With Yom Kippur

10/01/2014
Special To The Jewish Week
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“I always say I’m sorry when I’ve hurt someone,” a man told me proudly in a recent conversation, a reflection that seemed appropriate in advance of Yom Kippur, which is so focused on repentance. “It’s the most important thing,” he said, looking me squarely in the eye with a mixture of impassioned education and nuanced reprimand. He is right, of course. And this is the season, I suppose, for all that — for remorse, apologies and open hearts. There is something beautiful and tender about all this, as members of the Jewish community engage in genuine and sincere introspection.

Elana Maryles Sztokman

Mixed Message On Mixed Marriage

10/01/2014
Members of the Board, Religious Zionists of America
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Gary Rosenblatt reports in his column, “At Year’s End, Struggling To Stay Together” (Sept. 19), that at a recent meeting of 50 Jewish “thought leaders and communal activists” in Baltimore, participants noted that many in the Jewish community measure the success or failure of Jewish education according to “the choice of a Jewish marriage partner.” Certainly despite other religious differences in the Jewish community, there is a broad consensus that intermarriage is undesirable.

Looking Out For Jewish Interests

10/01/2014
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The Sept. 26 front-page headline: “Klinghoffer’ Protest Moves Beyond Right Wing” should be a wake-up call, unfortunately, late in the game. Why do the “center” and the “left” award the “right” a monopoly on looking out for Jewish interests, speaking out and being proud Jews? 

Manhattan

‘Mainstream’ Response To Met Too Weak

10/01/2014
Executive Director
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Two articles in your Sept. 26 issue describe the organized efforts of “the right flank of the Jewish community” to stop the Metropolitan Opera presentation of the pro-terrorist opera, “The Death Of Klinghoffer” (“‘Klinghoffer’ Protest Moves Beyond Right Wing” and “Operatic Rage At Met Protest”).

Gelb’s Dual Role

10/01/2014
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Throughout the brouhaha over “The Death of Klinghoffer,” Peter Gelb, the Metropolitan Opera’s general manager, has sought to deflect criticism that the work is anti-Semitic by pointing out that he is himself Jewish (“‘Klinghoffer’ Protest Moves Beyond Right Wing,” Sept. 26). Now, it seems, Gelb has ratcheted it up a notch by presenting himself not as just a member-in-good-standing of the Jewish community but as an out-and-out defender of the community’s interests. 

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