Letters

Misleading Ramapo Headline

04/24/2014
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The headline on the April 11 story about the East Ramapo public school district, “It’s Now Orthodox vs. Orthodox In Ramapo,” is stretching the truth. In contrast to the membership and Orthodox electorate of the school district, how many of them are affiliated with Uri L’Tzedek?

Frightened By BDS

04/24/2014
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Your editorial “Making Mischief Of The Parade” (April 11) is understandable as a plea for unity and inclusiveness. However, it ridicules and excludes those who are frightened by the growth of BDS.

Parade Politics

04/24/2014
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In response to the online Opinion piece by Stephanie Ives, “Why New Israel Fund
Is Marching For Israel,” there is opposition to NIF participation in the
Israel unity parade because some of its grantees boycott products produced
beyond Israel’s 1949 armistice line. Such boycotts, unlike that of cottage
cheese, and of stores open on Shabbat by the very observant, as mentioned by the
author as justification, are far different. These are out of religious
conviction or to lower the price of an item. Boycotts of “settlement
products” perpetuated by the far left are organized and meant to cripple
existing businesses based upon ideological differences.

Pluralistic Voices Needed

04/24/2014
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I applaud the efforts of the Ruderman Foundation in bringing greater
awareness of American Jewish life to Israeli leaders (“Schooling The
Knesset,” Between The Lines, April 9). Especially valuable was the discussion of the various
denominations and the limitations of a denominational system in serving Klal
Yisrael. I am concerned, however, that those very limitations were reflected
in the makeup of the discussants. It would have been valuable to all
concerned, and particularly enlightening to the Israeli leaders in
attendance, to have included representatives of post-denominational and
pluralistic institutions in the gathering.

Seder Connects To Ancient Tradition

04/24/2014
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It is with great sadness that I read your article on how some of our young
people are not going to seders (“Passover Seder Losing Steam As Key Marker Of Affiliation,” April 9).
A seder done traditionally is a wonderful experience that can evoke
discussion around the table on the very fundamental issue of freedom. It’s an
issue that is as relevant today as it was thousands of years ago.

Seder Tsuris

04/24/2014
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Seder Attendance Figures

04/24/2014
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Steve Lipman’s “Passover Seder Losing Steam As Key Marker Of Affiliation” (April 9) quoted me as doubting the “drop in seder attendance is as dramatic as indicated.” Unfortunately he didn’t recount the basis for my doubts.
Here’s one example that just considers national survey data. Lipman quotes figures that suggest that in the 1990s seder attendance stood at about 90 percent and now has fallen to 70 percent, according to the 2013 Pew survey.

In Plain Sight

04/17/2014
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Ethan Bronner of The New York Times feels “exasperated” (according to Gary Rosenblatt’s April 4 article, “Seeking The Middle In The Middle East”) that he has been accused of anti-Israel bias. He then proceeds to mouth precisely the kind of biased statements that have elicited such criticism.

Change One Word

04/17/2014
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In his Letter (March 28), Gil Kulick proposes that, among other things, Prime Minister Netanyahu could say to the Palestinians that “Israel will immediately cease building new housing for settlers across the Green Line until an Israeli-Palestinian peace agreement is concluded.” I would suggest a one-word change: Replace “until” with “when.” Otherwise the Palestinians will have no incentive to ever conclude a peace agreement.

Westport, Conn.
 

Failed Analogy

04/17/2014
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In defending a gendered Orthodox Judaism (“Why a Gendered Judaism Makes Sense,” Opinion online), Rabbis Chaim Strauchler and Joshua Strulowitz ask why “a standard for egalitarian living would be demanded of religion, but not from the marketplace or from popular culture.”

This argument by analogy fails to take into account that societal gender norms are not binding on any person — no girl is prohibited from wearing blue, and men have the freedom to see romantic comedies if they enjoy them. The prescriptive halachic gender roles Rabbis Strauchler and Strulowitz defend, on the other hand, do not accommodate or even acknowledge the many women and men who do not comfortably fit traditional models of femininity and masculinity.

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