The Yad

On Point With Today's News

Jewish Feminism Chai

Bella Abzug. Gloria Steinem. Shulamith Firestone. Lesley Gore?

There are lots of ways to be a feminist.

Lesley Gore, who grew up in a Jewish family in Tenafly, New Jersey, won the right to be classed with the above grandes dames in 1964 with the release of “You Don’t Own Me,” which became a feminist anthem.

Lesley Gore, Jewish feminist. Getty Images

Kipot Under Attack – Keep It Under Your Hat

The headline over a story on page 2 of the current issue of “Jewish Voice from Germany,” and an accompanying photograph in the monthly publication caught my attention.

The headline: “The Day Berlin Wore the Kippah.” The photograph: a front-page of Berlin’s Berliner Zeitung (B.Z.) newspaper that shows five men, mostly of them probably not Jewish, with prominent kipot atop their heads.

Front page of Berliner Zeitung newspaper: Solidarity against anti-Semitism

Let’s Stand Up And Count

At this point, most folks who care know that the nones are on the rise.

A record one in all five adults – and almost a third of adults under 30 – have no religious affiliation, according to a Pew Research Center poll released Oct. 9.

Taking a census is inconvenient, but it's necessary. Getty Images

Larsen's Perfect Decision

Few of us have the chance to achieve perfection.

Don Larsen did, 56 years ago, earlier this month, in sports.

A unremarkable pitcher for the N.Y. Yankees, Larsen pitched a perfect game – no hits, no walks, no men on base at all – in the 5th game of the 1956 World Series, beating the Brooklyn Dodgers’ Sal Maglie, an outstanding player who pitched an outstanding two-run five--hitter that day.

Don Larsen: Making history in '56 World Series

Like Weimar, But Better

More than anyone else, gay Jews are have cause to reflect on Weimar Germany’s mixed legacy.

On the one hand, both gay and Jewish culture flourished in that place and time, and had a dramatic impact on the rest of the world. On the other, that period was also full of menace, of threats that the Nazis would soon carry out.

Yet tomorrow, proud and vital members of this group will board a plane for Berlin to grapple with that history – and go clubbing.

He'bro, the events promotion business backing an LGBT-Jewish trip to Germany, knows how to have fun. Via myhebro.com

A Strike For Perseverance

Add one more name to the list of Jewish baseball players who have had an at-bat in the major leagues.

One at-bat.

Adam Greenberg, arguably the most prominent Jew in sports in recent weeks, walked to home plate last week, bat in hand, for the first time in 2012. It was the first – and probably final – official at-bat of his pro career, on the penultimate day of the regular season.

Adam Greenberg: At-bat, finally

No Reason To Feel 'Blue' This Yom Tov

This Yom Tov, and the past two, are exactly the kind of timing local kosher liquor stores used to dread.

When holidays fell on Sunday night, kosher consumers who wait until the last minute were in for an unpleasant surprise: Liquor stores were required to close on Sundays under New York's antiquated Blue Laws. If you were wise to this fact you'd shop in advance on Friday since Saturday is out for the Shomer Shabbos crowd. Otherwise, you were left scrambling for kiddush wine or Yom Tov spirits at certain permitted markets after 12 pm, where selections were limited.

Every-Day Once-A-Year-Jews

My annual custom on the last day of the High Holy Days is to daven at the Yom Kippur minyan of Chabad of Rego Park. Not a chasid, not a member of the Chabad-Lubavitch chasidic movement, I feel great spiritual authenticity in the atmosphere of intimacy, surrounded by a few hundred other worshippers, which Rabbi Eli Blokh creates.

His Yom Kippur services take place in the basement social hall of the Queens Jewish Center, a large Modern Orthodox synagogue around the corner from my apartment.

Rabbi Eli Blokh: "We are all Yom Kippur Jews."

The Best Place To Die

If you had to die, where would you do it?

An Israeli professor of economics at Stanford University suggests a kibbutz.

His grandmother, an unlettered seamstress who fled anti-Semitism in her native Poland to Kibbutz Negba, died there with the best, around-the-clock care.

How do kibbutzim not only survive, but thrive? Photo courtesy Wikipedia Commons

The Errors Of Ours Ways

The text of my reading material last week on the eve of Rosh HaShanah was about people making errors. The subtext: some errors are never forgotten, never wiped clean, stain a person’s reputation forever.

I wasn’t reading Days of Repentance theology. I was reading The New York Times sports pages.

Bill Buckner
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