The Yad

On Point With Today's News

UPDATED: Lessons From A Kind Cop


Had a cop been photographed callously walking by an ostensibly homeless man who sat barefoot on one of the coldest nights of the year, it likely would have generated as much media attention as what actually happened:  Officer Larry DePrimo stopped and bought the man a pair of boots and socks.

To Officer Larry DePrimo, a barefoot man in the cold is "unacceptable."

Public And Private Mitzvahs

While New York cleaned up, the President visited.

In the days after the city’s worst hurricane in history struck, as New Yorkers – along with affected residents of New Jersey and other reeling areas of the Northeast – struggled to get on with the lives that had become bruised by Sandy, Barack Obama came for a visit. For three hours, he traveled to the Rockaways and Staten Island, consoling the victims and offering moral support and seeing the damage first-hand.

Jacob Javits: No media, please

Pet Peevishness Over A JPost Tweet

It’s a tough crowd out there on Twitter, particularly when you wade into anything related to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict.

Our former staff writer Sharon Udasin, who now covers animals, scientific innovation and the environment for The Jerusalem Post, learned that the hard way Monday when one of her tweets generated a firestorm of criticism, mockery, an unfavorable al-Jazeera mention and even some death threats.

Hamas Doesn't Faze U.S. Students

My assignment this week was straight-forward and predictable: with hostilities heating up in Israel, with Hamas missiles from Gaza starting to aim at Tel Aviv and Jerusalem, with tens of thousands of reserve soldiers being called into active service, with Israel standing on the brink of war, I was to look into the situation of the thousands of teenage students from the States who are spending their gap year learning in Israeli yeshivot (the boys) and seminaries (the girls).

Missiles rain down, but U.S. students in Israel are staying put despite the conflict with Hamas. Getty Images

A Mea Culpa From The Media

As Israel’s offensive in Gaza gathers momentum, many in the Jewish community have noticed international coverage of suffering in the strip.

They have accordingly seized the opportunity to again protest the media’s neglect of Sderot and other southern Isareli communities that bear the burden of daily bombardment.

Palestinians search the debris of the al-Dallu family home after an Israeli airstrike on Nov. 18. Getty Images

Happy Landing -- In Ireland

About a half dozen El Al flights between Israel and the United States were cancelled in recent days by the winds and waves of Hurricane Sandy, which made flying and taking off and landing precarious. The El Al flights, among hundreds of domestic and international ones that became victims of one of the most damaging storms to reach the Northeast, were a minor news story – of special interest mainly to Jewish travelers.

Shush, Sheldon

The 2012 election results revealed Sheldon Adelson’s $53 million in campaign donations to be a poor investment. Nearly all of the candidates he funded lost.

Of course, the CEO of Las Vegas Sands Corp. is the 12th-wealthiest American and must be a talented businessman.

Sheldon Adelson didn't pick winners in 2012. Getty Images

The Non-Believer's Stake In The Election

One of the most-obscure voter’s guide to cross my desk – actually my computer screen – in this election season arrived a few weeks ago, on the eve of the second presidential debate between Barack Obama and Mitt Romney.

Among the countless guides issued by various political, environmental, educational and religious organizations came one from a decidedly non-religious group: The Secular Coalition for America.

Gary Johnson: The Libertarians' choice for the presidency

The Hand Of God And The Hands Of People

Writing on the Algemeiner’s web site shortly before Hurricane Sandy hit, Simon Jacobson asked us to consider the “deeper implications” of the catastrophic event.

That includes the "hard-to -ignore coincidence of the hurricane striking the most heavily populated part of the country, including Washington DC, just a week before the Presidential election – winds from above disturbing the final whirlwind campaign efforts of both candidates.”

The Blizzard's Familiar; Only The Color Was Different

The announcements of an approaching storm. The warnings about possible damage. The advice about what to do and not to do.  The panic, and the inevitable been-there-heard-that-I’m staying-put attitude of some people.

To New Yorkers, the advance of Hurricane Sandy from the South last week was a novel experience. How often do hurricanes strike the Big Apple?

Buffalo, 1977: Another year, another storm
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